Monday, 26 September 2016

New ScotlandsPeople website launch delayed again

Just posted on ScotlandsPeople Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/ScotlandsPeople):

Update on new ScotlandsPeople website

As most of you will be aware, the new ScotlandsPeople website was scheduled to launch today (Monday 26 September).

While every effort has been made to meet this deadline, it has become apparent that we need a bit more time to test the new site and satisfy ourselves that it is completely ready for launch.

We now expect the new ScotlandsPeople website to go live within the next few days.

Remember, once you log-in to the new site for the first time you will see that your credits, saved images and searches are all be available.

Thank you all for your continued patience and support. We’re sorry for the inconvenience caused and look forward to welcoming you to the new site soon.


Comment: On days like this I am glad I am also half-Irish - I've plenty to be getting on with there!

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

GB1900 British maps crowdsourcing project launched

From the National Library of Scotland (www.nls.uk):

Help save GB place names from being lost for ever

A new online project – GB1900 – is calling for volunteers in Great Britain to help make sure local place-names can live on rather than be lost for ever.


GB1900 aims to create a complete list of the estimated three million place-names on early Ordnance Survey maps of Britain. It will be a free, public resource, of particular use to local historians and genealogists.

The project partners include the National Library of Scotland, the National Library of Wales, and the University of Portsmouth.

On their new GB1900 web site, http://www.gb1900.org/, volunteers will work on digital images of all the 2nd Edition Ordnance Survey County Series maps of the whole of Great Britain, at six inch to one mile scale (1888-1913). These maps show not just every town and village but every farm, hill and wood – and include names for most of them. The site’s software enables contributors to mark each name by clicking next to it, and then to type in the name itself. They can also add any personal memories they have of the place. To ensure correctness each name needs to be identically transcribed by two different volunteers.

The final list of place names will be not just the most detailed gazetteer ever created for Britain, it will be the world’s largest ever historical gazetteer. It will be released under a Creative Commons licence, making it usable by everyone without charge, and will be of great value for family and local historians.

GB1900 Project website: http://www.gb1900.org/
Further information: http://www.nls.uk/news/press/2016/09/place-names-volunteers

(With thanks to Chris Fleet)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Thursday, 22 September 2016

New ScotlandsPeople site launches Monday 26th Sept

Looks like it is definitely happening this time...! The current view on the ScotlandsPeople (www.scotlsandspeople.gov.uk) website:


Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Australian historian seeks participants for family history study

I've received a request from Dr Tanya Evans, MRes Director, Senior Lecturer and President of the History Council of New South Wales, with regard to a study that she is currently working on comparing family historians and the meanings of family history in Australia, England and Canada. Her request was to ask if I could participate - I mentioned I was none of the above, but an Irishman living in Scotland, and the response was, yes, I want that too!

Tanya's research will involve collecting survey data and a handful of oral history interviews. Her last book on family history in Australia, called Fractured Families: Life on the Margins in Colonial NSW, won the NSW Premiers' History Award in community and regional history. She has also written 2 books on the history of illegitimacy in England.

If you are happy to participate, please contact Tanya at Tanya.evans@mq.edu.au and she will email a consent form and the survey. I completed the survey late last night, it will take a wee while to work through, so I'd allow at least an hour. There were some very interesting questions, I certainly found it a worthwhile exercise.

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Wednesday, 21 September 2016

Australian history and genealogy expo 2016

Australian based firm Unlock the Past (www.unlockthepast.com.au) is hosting the country's first ever national expo in Adelaide on Friday 7th (10am-5pm) and Saturday 8th October 2016 (9am-4pm). The event will be held at Immanuel College, 32 Morphett Road, Novar Gardens.

The following is a summary of what to expect:

Expo overview
• 100 exhibitors
• 11 main theatre feature presentations
• 25 classroom presentations
• 62 short mini-theatre product demos, tutorials, etc. (free)
• micro-theatres at exhibitor stands—product information, demos, tutorials, etc. (free)
• one-on-one consultations with experts (free)
• over $3000 in prizes from exhibitors and sponsors

Eight reasons to be at Australia’s first national expo
1. Australia’s first ever national history/genealogy expo
2. see 100 organisations and product and service suppliers in one place—the largest number ever for any history/genealogy event in Australia
3. choose from 98 topics from 47 speakers in 25 different time slots—the largest history/genealogy program ever offered in Australia
4. low cost admission—affordable for enthusiasts & casual visitors
5. one-on-one consultations with experts
6. special offers from many exhibitors
7. South Australians—attend a major event your own city
8. interstate visitors—an excuse to visit friends/relatives, do some research or just visit SA—enjoy a major expo

Program
The expo offers a wide ranging program — DNA, Google, engineering history, genealogy computing, health history, migration, military history (WWI, WWII), online data (Ancestry, FamilySearch, Findmypast, GenealogySA, MyHeritage, Ryerson Index, newspapers online), oral history, old photos, Australian research, overseas research (English, Scottish, Irish, German/European), sporting history, writing history ... and more.

Registration
Each registered attendee will receive a registration kit with information and special offers from exhibitors and sponsors as well as entry into the prize draw.

Meals and refreshments
Food will be provided by Vili's Mega Van—located close to the entrance to the venue. A good variety of food will be offered—more details on web site. A coffee cart will also be there. You are at liberty to bring your own food if you wish.

For more information, please visit www.unlockthepast.com.au/events/australian-history-genealogy-expo-2016.

COMMENT: In addition to the expo, Unlock the Past runs genealogy conference cruises, and also produces a series of genealogical guide books, including my latest book for them, A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy. You'll find all of the firm's books for sale there, as well as info on the cruises, and just about anything and everything on all aspects genealogical from the many venfors in attendance. I've been to a previous regional expo run by the company in Parramatta a few years back, as well as many other events hosted by the firm across the country in the last few years, and they are always good fun, with some great speakers - have fun!

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Religious occupation records now on TheGenealogist

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

New Occupational Records now on TheGenealogist

If your ancestor held a prominent position in a religious organisation then you may find them in amongst a number of recent releases at TheGenealogist.co.uk. The new records include:

* The Year Book of The Church of England in the Dominion of Canada 1926 & 1935 - These year books contain the details of the members of clergy in Canada.
* New Zealand Methodist Union Index 1913 - Listing details of Methodist Ministers and their placements in New Zealand up to 1912.
* Catholic Directory 1867 & 1877 - Directories of Catholic Clergy with addresses for England, Scotland and Wales.
* Biographical Dictionary of English Catholics 1534 to 1885 - This work by Joseph Gillow gives biographies of prominent Catholics which often include details of their family, education and achievements.
* Shropshire Roman Catholic Registers 1763-1837
* The Roman Catholics in the County of York 1604
* Various Catholic Record Society volumes - These include a variety of interesting records including various Catholic Church registers, memoirs and letters of prominent Catholics and Recusant Rolls.
* Jewish Year Books 1896-99, 1901-8, 1910-11, 1918-21, 1925, and 1928-39 - These year books list the details of prominent people within each synagogue, obituaries, Jewish officers in the Army, Navy and Auxiliary Forces, Ministers, MPs, Peers, and even Jewish 'Celebrities' of the time.
* Jewish Synagogue Seatholders in London for 1920, 1922, 1925, 1927, 1929, 1931, 1933, 1937
* The Clergyman's Almanack 1821 & 1822 - These Almanacks list archbishops, bishops, dignitaries, MPs and Peers.
* Register of Missionaries 1796-1923 - A register of the missionaries and deputations of the London Society of Missionaries. This book includes many details about each missionary, as well as listing their wives (including their maiden name).
* Durham Diocesan Calendar 1931

These records compliment an already wide range of religious occupational records such as Cox's Clergy Lists and Crockford's Clerical Directories, Jewish Seatholders, Catholic Registers, and Directories already on TheGenealogist. Diamond subscribers can access these records by going to the Search tab on the home page - scrolling down to Occupational Records and then selecting the type of records that they are interested in.

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Tuesday, 20 September 2016

Latest British Newspaper Archive additions

The latest releases on the British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) over the last 30 days:

Barnsley Chronicle, etc. 1866 - 1871, 1873 - 1877, 1879 - 1888, 1891 - 1892, 1894 - 1896, 1898 - 1909
Belfast Telegraph 1902
Birmingham Chronicle. 1819 - 1822, 1824 - 1827
Brighton Guardian 1877
Brighton Herald 1833, 1873, 1877, 1881, 1889
Buxton Herald 1951
Cork Constitution 1863, 1874 - 1875, 1877 - 1878, 1893 - 1894
Coventry Evening Telegraph 1939
Dartmouth & South Hams chronicle 1869, 1871 - 1874, 1894 - 1896, 1899 - 1909
Dundee Advertiser 1895, 1897, 1899
Durham Chronicle 1824 - 1831, 1834 - 1837, 1839 - 1855, 1857 - 1859, 1868
East & South Devon Advertiser. 1874 - 1878, 1882 - 1884, 1886 - 1887, 1890 - 1894
Globe 1804, 1811 - 1812, 1818 - 1819, 1821
Kentish Gazette 1814
Leeds Mercury 1921 - 1926
Norwich Mercury 1727, 1846 - 1848, 1854, 1856 - 1884, 1896, 1899 - 1904
Preston Herald 1863 - 1876, 1882, 1900 - 1901, 1912, 1914 - 1918
Roscommon & Leitrim Gazette 1852 - 1862, 1864 - 1873, 1876 - 1880, 1882
Tyne Mercury; Northumberland and Durham and Cumberland Gazette 1802 - 1808, 1815 - 1822, 1826
Warwick and Warwickshire Advertiser 1823 - 1827, 1830 - 1831, 1837, 1866 - 1871, 1878 - 1891, 1897 - 1911, 1913 - 1914, 1916 - 1918, 1929, 1931 - 1934, 1939 - 1956
Waterford Mirror and Tramore Visitor. 1862 - 1868, 1872, 1884 - 1886, 1888, 1891 - 1892, 1896 - 1906
Waterford Standard 1897, 1899, 1901 - 1911, 1928 - 1932, 1937 - 1950
West Surrey Times 1856 - 1857
Western Morning News 1860 - 1861, 1865, 1867, 1869 - 1870, 1883 - 1885, 1892 - 1893, 1896 - 1905, 1907 - 1909, 1914 - 1919

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Monday, 19 September 2016

National Archives of Ireland completes genealogy site collections

Last week the National Archives of Ireland (www.nationalarchives.ie) added several major new digitised record sets to FindmyPast (see http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2016/09/free-national-archives-of-ireland.html). The same records have now been added to the archive's own digital collections site at www.genealogy.nationalarchives.ie - all are completely free to access.

The newly added collections are as follows, each with its own dedicated URL address for direct access, and descriptions as detailed on the site:

Prerogative and diocesan copies of some wills and indexes to others, 1596 – 1858
http://census.nationalarchives.ie/search/dw/home.jsp

Before 1858, grants of probate and administration were made by the courts of the Church of Ireland (the Prerogative Court and the Diocesan or Consistorial Courts). Almost all of the original records were destroyed in the Public Record Office in 1922. Most of what appears on this site are indexes to the original wills.

For the pre-1858 ecclesiastical courts, will books containing copies of the originals survive for the Prerogative Court (1664-1684, 1706-1708, 1726-1728, 1728-1729, 1777, 1813 and 1834) and some Diocesan Courts – Connor (1818-1820 and 1853-1858) and Down (1850-1858). The will books for Armagh, Belfast and Londonderry are in the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland.

The records can be searched by name, date, residence and district or diocese.


Diocesan and Prerogative Marriage Licence Bonds Indexes, 1623 – 1866
http://census.nationalarchives.ie/search/dm/home.jsp

If your ancestors marry in Ireland between 1623 and 1866, they may have been married by licence rather than by banns. Marriage licences were granted, on payment of a fee, by the ecclesiastical courts of the Church of Ireland. The original records were destroyed in the Public Record Office explosion of 1922, but indexes survive, and record Protestant marriages as far back as 1623.

The indexes will give you names of spouses, year of marriage and diocese.

(NB: I didn't see this on FindmyPast a few days ago, but this collection is also now available there at http://search.findmypast.com/search-world-Records/ireland-diocesan-and-prerogative-marriage-licence-bonds-indexes-1623-1866)


Catholic qualification & convert rolls, 1700 – 1845
http://census.nationalarchives.ie/search/cq/home.jsp

Throughout the eighteenth century, restrictions enacted by the Penal Laws were relaxed for those Catholics who took the Oath of Allegiance to the King and renounced their religion for that of the established Church of Ireland. In the majority of cases this was not a sincere renunciation of the Catholic religion, as it was the only legal means whereby a Catholic could obtain basic civil rights.

In 1774 an Act was passed to permit the King’s subjects, of any religion, to take an oath at the local assizes (courts) “to testify to their loyalty and allegiance to him, to promote peace and industry in the kingdom.”

These names were then registered in the Catholic Qualification Rolls according to surname, first name, address, and date of qualification. Occupation is sometimes also supplied. The rolls cover the period from 1700 to 1845, with most entries after 1800 dealing with naturalised citizens. Over 50,000 people are listed.

The Rolls can be searched by name, date, county, residence and diocese. The county, residence and diocese entries are not consistent; sometimes all three appear; sometimes only one.


Valuation Office house, field, tenure and quarto books 1824 – 1856
http://census.nationalarchives.ie/search/vob/home.jsp

The printed volumes of the Primary (or Griffith’s) Valuation, the record of Ireland’s first comprehensive property tax, have been available online for many years now, and are a crucial part of the genealogical infrastructure for the mid-nineteenth century. But the records which underlie and inform the printed valuation have never been digitised until now, and they contain more information about households and landholding than can be found in the printed version.

There are four distinct kinds of books involved, and our former Director, Frances Magee, who has worked on these records for years, has written descriptive notes on each of them to clarify their functions and the information they contain. Begin with her General Note, and move on to the four descriptions linked below.

General Note
Field Books
House Books
Tenure Books
Quarto Books

These records contain over 2 million names. They provide a comprehensive assessment of the rental value of Irish lands and property from the mid-1820s to the mid-1850s. The books reveal where and when individuals rented or owned property and provide rare glimpses of life in pre-famine Ireland.



Shipping agreements and crew lists, 1863 – 1921
http://census.nationalarchives.ie/search/cl/home.jsp

The records of the Registrar General of Shipping and Seamen consist of crew lists, and agreements with seamen regarding wage rates, conditions of service and related information, of ships registered in what is now the south of Ireland between 1860 and 1921. They came to the National Archives in 1971 and 1978 from the Board of Trade in Britain.

The shipping records contain much useful information, including

Crews: Name, age or year of birth, town or district of birth, last ship served on, port to which she belonged, date and place of discharge from previous ship, date and place of joining present ship, capacity in which he joined, if service discontinued, cause, date and place.
Ship: Name, registered number, port of registry, date of registry, owner’s name and address, dates and places of arrivals and departures.
Log: Date of event logged, occurrence situation by longitude and latitude, amount of fine or forfeiture inflicted.
Wages: Amount of wages per calendar month, share or voyage.
Provisions: Scale of provisions to be served to the crew each day given with weights per day for bread, flour, coffee, butter, water, beef, peas, sugar, tea, port.
Apprentices: Name, age, date of indenture, port of indenture, date of assignment, port of assignment.
Births: Date, name, sex, parents’ names, mother’s maiden name, occupation of father, nationality and last abode of parents.
Deaths: Of crew: name, agreement reference number, net wages paid. Of passengers: date of death, name, age, sex, occupation, parents’ names, cause of death.

The records are searchable by name, vessel name, departure port, date of event, age, town/county of origin, year of birth, year of death, place of death.



Will Registers 1858 – 1900
http://census.nationalarchives.ie/search/wr/home.jsp

This series comprises over 550,000 records, forming the largest collection of surviving wills for the post-1858 period for what is now the Republic of Ireland. The registers allow researchers to explore the pages of the wills to discover where their families lived, what assets they had, if they were left to relatives, and if not, to whom.

Readers can connect these records to the already available Calendars of Wills and Administrations to get concise information about amount of assets, executors and beneficiaries.

These records are also major resources for social and economic history, providing, as they do, hitherto untapped information about financial and property assets, family relationships, family economic development over time, and gender and class relations. Our Browse feature will allow easy access to information for each county, thus facilitating local studies.

And don't forget the other free to access collections already available on the site:
  • Census of Ireland, 1901 and 1911, and pre-1901 survivals
  • Census Search Forms, 1841 – 51
  • Tithe Applotment Books, 1823 – 37
  • Soldiers’ Wills, 1914 – 1918
  • Calendars of Wills and Administrations, 1858 – 1922


COMMENT: Mark this day in your diary. Say whatever farewells you need to say to your loved ones, before you lock yourself away for the next few weeks to look at all of this. Then go and play.

Well done NAI; well done Ireland!


Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Friday, 16 September 2016

ScotlandsPeople service announcement

Second time lucky, hopefully, for the launch of the new ScotlandsPeople (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk) website:

Service announcement for the ScotlandsPeople website

ScotlandsPeople will be offline from 23.59 (BST) on Wednesday 21 September until Monday 26 September. This downtime is essential as we work towards the launch of our new ScotlandsPeople website.

Customers visiting the ScotlandsPeople Centre in Edinburgh or using one of the local family history centres will be able to access records as usual on Thursday 22, Friday 23 and Monday 26 September 2016.

You will be pleased to note that once the new site is launched, all of your credits and saved images from our existing site will be available.

We are sorry for the inconvenience this may cause you and thank you for your patience.

Thank you.

(With thanks to ScotlandsPeople)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Lincolnshire parish records updated on FindmyPast

In addition to announcing its new Irish collections (see http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2016/09/free-national-archives-of-ireland.html), FindmyPast has announced an update to its Lincolnshire parish records:


ADDITIONAL RECORDS & FEATURES FOR EXISTING SETS

Lincolnshire Baptisms

Our collection of Lincolnshire baptisms are now available to search by name, year, place and parent's names. Lincolnshire baptisms contains over 1.9 million parish records dating from 1538 to 1911 and will allow you to discover your ancestors birth year, baptism date, location and parent's names. Each record consists of both an image and a transcript of the original document.

Lincolnshire Banns
Lincolnshire banns is now available to search by name, year, spouse's name and location. The collection contains over 121,000 records covering banns read in Lincolnshire parish churches between 1538 and 1911. The records allow you to discover your ancestor's residence, banns date, spouse's name' spouse's residence and location. Banns are the announcement of a couple's intention to marry and were read out in the parish church on three Sundays, three months before the intended marriage date.

Lincolnshire Marriages
Our Lincolnshire marriage records are now available to search by name, spouses name and location. The collection now contains over 933,000 records and covers more than 650 locations across the county. Discover your ancestor's age, birth year, residence, marriage date, location, father's name and spouse's details as far back as 1538.

Lincolnshire Burials
You can now search our Lincolnshire burial records by name, birth year, burial year and location. Lincolnshire burials contains over 1.4 million records covering more than 300 burial places across the county. Discover your ancestor's age at death, birth year, burial date and burial location.

Lincolnshire Parish Register Browse
Browse over 5000 parish registers containing more than 4.4 million records of baptisms, marriages and burials from all over Lincolnshire.

See https://blog.findmypast.com/findmypast-friday-september-16-2016-2006112242.html for further information.

Chris


For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.