Friday, 20 October 2017

Kirkcaldy Poor Law records on Ancestry

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has added some poor law records from Kirkcaldy in Fife, Scotland, to its site.

Kikcaldy, Fife, Scotland, Poor Law Records, 1888-1912
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61428
Source: Abden Poorhouse Record Book, Fife Library and Archives Service, Fife, Scotland.

About Kikcaldy, Fife, Scotland, Poor Law Records, 1888-1912

This collection contains Poor Law Union Records for Kikcaldy, Fife, Scotland ranging from 1888-1912. It includes records for those who received help from the Abden Home Poor Law Institution, originally named the Kirkcaldy Combination Poorhouse.

Details vary depending on record type, but you might find facts such as:

Name
Date of admission
Date of discharge
Reason discharged
Occupation
Gender
Marital status
Religion
Age
Date of death


The record page unfortunately has a collection description which is just completely wrong, discussing the implementation of the poor law system in England from 1601 and 1834.

At the risk of sounding like a broken record... Scotland is not England!

The Old Poor Law Act in Scotland was passed in 1579, whilst the Poor Law (Scotland) Amendment Act provisions did not commence until 1845. There were never any Boards of Guardians involved in Scotland, instead, we had parochial boards which answered to a Board of Supervision in Edinburgh.

Ancestry may well wish to revisit this description....!

UPDATE 21 OCT: Ancestry has revisited the Historical Context description, and replaced a few paragraphs on the English poor law system with the following extremely short description of Scotland's set up:

"After the Poor Law Scotland Act of 1845, Scottish parishes were able to establish institutions to care for the poor, house them and give out relief. Whilst there was a Central Supervising body, each institution was locally run."

If you need a wee bit more on how Scotland's set up actually existed, do check out my book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis (see http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html)!

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

NSW Colonial Secretary's Letters 1826-1856 join Ancestry

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has added a new Australian collection, indexed as part of its World Archives Project:

New South Wales, Australia, Colonial Secretary's Letters, 1826-1856
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61481
Source: State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.

The collection New South Wales, Australia, Colonial Secretary's Letters, 1826-1856 consist mainly of copies of letters to the Principle Superintendent of Convicts and to the Land Board in relation to the assignment of convict servants. Letters and records of various events make up the majority of the collections: petitions by convicts for sentence mitigation, marriage permission requests, character memorials for potential settlers, land grant or lease applications, official visit reports, information about court cases, and lists of assigned servants. These files were organized by the Colonial Secretary, or Secretary to the Governor of New South Wales.

The colony of New South Wales is located on the south-east coast of Australia and became a state of the Commonwealth of Australia in 1901. Prior to that date it was a British colony whose first settlement was a penal colony governed by Captain Arthur Phillip in 1788. During the time period of this collection, 1788 through 1856, 10 different governors were assigned to the colony, which existed in a steady state of anarchy until the appointment of Governor Lachlan Macquarie, who cracked down on active rebellion leaders and built local infrastructure in the form of roads, wharves, churches, and public buildings. Mentioned in this collection is Governor William Bligh. An officer of the British Royal Navy, he had the reputation of a firm disciplinarian and was appointed the fourth governor of New South Wales in 1805 with the assignment to straighten out the colony and clean up the corrupt rum trade. He was deposed in 1808 by a group of settlers in what is known as the Rum Rebellion, and held captive until 1810.

Within these records you can find significant information about your ancestors if they lived or immigrated to New South Wales during this time period. If they requested to marry, resettle in New South Wales, or acquire a land grant these requests would have been processed by the colonial secretary or other administrative personnel. For more general information about Australian records and research see Searching for Roots Down Under by Janet Reakes in the Learning Center. This article provides a short history of the settlement of Australia, suggests other databases on the Ancestry.com site to search, and includes a brief summary of the kinds of records you can look for in order to further your research.

Information in this database:

Given name
Surname
Event date
Event description

This collection is only partially indexed but all of the images may be viewed using the browse.

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Thrift Genealogical Abstracts added to FindmyPast

Several Irish themed collections have been added to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.com) this week:

Thrift Genealogical Abstracts

Containing over 150,000 records, the Thrift genealogical abstracts were created by renowned genealogist, Gertrude Thrift, at the turn of the last century. Findmypast's exclusive access to Thrift's abstracts provides a vast amount of genealogical material dating back to the 1500s. Thrift transcribed and created detailed notes from military commission books, parish registers, exchequer bill books, prerogative grants, chancery bill books, freeman rolls, wills, and more. Many of the wills copied within this collection were lost during the fire at the Public Record Office of Ireland in Dublin in 1922.

Thrift also constructed comprehensive family trees for names such as Gennys, Read, Jagoe, Seymour, Rainsford, and Guinness. In the records, you will find twelve pages of the Guinness family tree, beginning with Richard and Elizabeth Guinness, the parents of the famous brewer Arthur Guinness. The tree traces multiple lines and each name includes an annotation of the person's birth and death dates, occupation, accomplishments, and marital status.


Crossle Genealogical Abstracts

The Crossle Genealogical abstracts were created in the 19th century by Dr Francis Crossle and his son Philip. Containing over 657,000 Irish records, this rich genealogical resource contains valuable copies of prerogative court wills from 1620 to 1804, which were destroyed in the fire at the Public Record Office in Dublin in 1922.

Crossle also provides a wealth of material for those tracing military ancestors including yearly Army returns from 1767 through to 1816 and is an excellent resource for those tracing their ancestors in Northern Ireland.


Betham Genealogical Abstracts

Explore abstracts and genealogical sketches created by herald Sir William Betham. Containing over 489,000 records, these notebooks are an excellent substitute for missing records and include abstracts of wills, reconstructed family trees and detailed pedigrees that can be searched by name, year, or keyword.


Cork, Pobble O'Keefe Census 1830-1852

Search over 4,000 records from seven local censuses - 1830, 1834, 1836, 1849, 1850, 1851, and 1852 - from the townland Pobble O'Keefe in Cork to discover who your ancestor was living with as well as their occupation, birth year and marital status.


Yorkshire Burials

More than 75,000 new Yorkshire burial records are now available to search and explore. Yorkshire burials covers the three historic Yorkshire counties as well as records from Quaker and Roman Catholic parishes and municipal cemeteries. The collection allows you to search records from ten Yorkshire archives and family histor
y societies that will reveal your ancestors age at death, birth year, burial date, and burial place.

Further details are available at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-2498844701.html

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

How did medieval people walk?!

I love a bit of quirky, I do!

The following video popped up on my timeline, having been shared in a blogpost by Kelly Faircloth at https://pictorial.jezebel.com/this-video-of-how-medieval-people-walked-is-oddly-compe-1819217663. It features a German gent by the name of Cornelius Berthold addressing an issue that I was never even aware of before - the fact that in the medieval period, people walked in a very different way to how they do today. It was all down to the footwear!

Enjoy...!



(Also available at https://youtu.be/EszwYNvvCjQ)

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Archive conservation work

There are two good articles online today discussing the work of conservators in preserving and repairing archive based material.

First, the National Records of Scotland blog has a post at https://blog.nrscotland.gov.uk/2017/10/20/conservation-for-the-nation/, written by NRS conservator Gloria Conti, detailing the work of the facility's Conservation Services Branch in Edinburgh.


Elsewhere, the National Archives in England has a blog post online at http://blog.nationalarchives.gov.uk/blog/banishing-bulk-conserving-17th-century-volume/ detailing the specific conservation work applied to a 17th century binding of a documents collection from the weirdly and wonderfully named Office of First Fruits and Tenths and the Court of Augmentations, within the Exchequer records held at the facility.

For a great story on a further successful conservation effort, don't forget to visit the website of the Great Parchment Book project at www.greatparchmentbook.org, including the wonderful video on its homepage showing how this important work concerning the Ulster Plantations was rescued after severe fire damage.

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Wednesday, 18 October 2017

MyHeritage DNA on Good Morning Britain

MyHeritage's Aaron Godfrey was on the UK programme Good Morning Britain promoting the company's DNA testing service. The following is the clip...



(Also available at https://youtu.be/qvNSazbIZGk)

From a family history research point of view, Aaron shows that the company's DNA testing kit is useful for establishing cousin connections, highlighting matches in Susanna Reid's DNA profile with cousins in Scotland and Denmark. There is also some seriously cringeworthy discussion on ethnicity, not least with tabloid presenter Piers Morgan's conclusions on his findings - if you can skip through his bits, you'll probably enjoy it more!

For more on DNA testing through MyHeritage, visit https://www.myheritage.com/dna.

(With thanks to Daniel Horowitz)

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Monday, 16 October 2017

FamilySearch Worldwide Indexing Event

FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org) is to hold a Worldwide Indexing Event from October 20th-22nd. From the press release at https://www.familysearch.org/blog/en/2017-worldwide-indexing-event/:

As in years past, the purpose of the event will be to unite the international indexing community around the common goal of making more historical records searchable online for free. Last year’s event broke the previous records with more than 100,000 indexers helping to index over 10,000,000 records.

This year, we encourage local wards to set their own goals for participation in the event. Local participation will help indexers feel more united with each other and connected with the records they are indexing.

Over 50,000 people have already signed up to participate. To have a look, practice and participate, visit the dedicated event page at https://www.familysearch.org/IndexingEvent2017?icid=bl-wi17-6598.

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotlhttps://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.
and 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at

Saturday, 14 October 2017

Tracing your Irish and Scots-Irish Ancestors conference 2018

From the Ulster Historical Foundation (www.ancestryireland.com):

Tracing your Irish and Scots-Irish Ancestors: A Family History Conference
05-12 September 2018

Celebrate 300 years and more of migration, and mark the tercentenary of the 1718 migration with visits to sites and places synonymous with the migration of Ulster and Irish families to the New Worlds (North America, Australasia, South Africa etc).

During our 7 day conference you will be able to shape your own experiences by choosing to either research in the different archives in Belfast and Dublin or join our staff on daily excursions through Ireland's beautiful landscape to some of its most historic sites.

Trips during our 2018 programme will see you embark on a guided through the Bann Valley, the area in Ulster most directly associated with the 1718 migration; walk on the walls and explore the historic port city of Derry/Londonderry, one of the finest examples of a walled city in Europe; uncover the stories of some of the earliest people to travel from Ulster to Australia at the Down Museum; visit the Ulster American Folk Park which is dedicated to the story of emigration from Ulster to North America in the 18th and 19th centuries; as well as delving deeper into the past with visits to the Hill of the O’Neill in Dungannon to learn about the 'Flight of the Earls' in 1607, when two of Ulster's leading lords left the island for Continental Europe, never to return and Barons Court, the magnificent seat of the Duke of Abercorn whose ancestors migrated from Scotland over 400 years ago.

These tours are also enlivened with visits to other renowned historical sites of interest across the island of Ireland as you will journey into pre-history to marvel at the UNESCO World Heritage site at Newgrange and look out onto the North Atlantic Ocean from the stones of the Giant’s Causeway.

You will also be able to visit Kilmainham Gaol, one of Dublin city’s most important monuments and visitor attractions and view the beautifully illustrated Book of Kells at Trinity College. All this and much much more!

To see what else is new in our 2018 programme go to: www.ancestryireland.com/family-history-conference/autumn/new-for-2018/

Early Bird Offer

Avail now of our early bird registration offer of only £899.99 (GBP) ($1187 approx.), giving a saving of £50 on the full price of £949.99 (GBP).

Places can fill up fast so reserve your place now, with a deposit of only £299.99 (GBP) per person!

Given the current low value of sterling (GBP) against other currencies now is a particularly good time for overseas visitors to purchase. The present exchange rate values will ensure overseas delegates can make a very tidy saving on the cost.

For more information go to www.ancestryireland.com/family-history-conference/autumn

Or if you have any queries, email: enquiry@uhf.org.uk

Need Help with your Family History Research?

For those of you who are thinking about attending our Tracing your Irish Ancestors conference we would highly recommend the following publications to help you prepare for your time with us.

Researching Scots-Irish Ancestors: The Essential Genealogical Guide to Early Modern Ulster, 1600-1800 by Dr William Roulston – This book is invaluable if you are researching ancestors prior to 1800 from the nine counties of the province of Ulster.

Tracing Your Irish Ancestors by John Grenham – This is the essential guide to researching your Irish roots.

Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians by Chris Paton – This book gives excellent practical guidance on how to exploit online resources.

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Friday, 13 October 2017

Judy G. Russell on the ethics of genetic genealogy

This is such a great wee video that it is worth sharing further! Genealogist Amy Johnson Crow has interviewed the US based 'Legal Genealogist', Judy G. Russell (www.legalgenealogist.com) about the ethics of genetic genealogy - the things to be wary of when taking a DNA test. Amy's original blog post is at https://www.amyjohnsoncrow.com/ethics-genetic-genealogy/, with the YouTube hosted video also displayed here:



Some great points to take on board - thanks to both Amy and Judy.

(With thanks to Jenna Mills for flagging it up for me on Google Plus)

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

London and Kent records added to FindmyPast

Latest additions from FindmyPast (www.findmypast.com):

London, Docklands and East End Baptisms, 1558-1933
Over 40,000 records covering the parishes St John Wapping, St Leonard Bromley, St Mary Bow & St Mary Whitechapel have been added to our collection of London, Docklands and East End Baptisms.

London, Docklands and East End Marriages, 1558-1859
Over 10,000 additional records have been added to London, Docklands and East End Marriages, 1558-1859. Covering the parishes of St John Bethnal Green, St John Wapping, St Leonard Bromley, St Luke Limehouse and St Mary Whitechapel, the new additions consists of transcripts of original Parish registers.

Greater London Burial Index
Over 35,000 new records covering Clerkenwell in central London have been added to the Greater London Burials Index. The Index contains over 1.6 million names from more than 230 parishes in the Greater London area and includes records from both Anglican and non-conformist parishes. The index City of London Burials, Middlesex Memorial Inscriptions, the Middlesex & City of London Burial Index and the South London Burials Index.

Kent, Canterbury Archdeaconry Baptisms
Over 13,000 records have been added to our Collection of Canterbury Archdeaconry Baptisms. The new additions cover the parishes of Chilham, Stalisfield & Staple and each record includes both a transcript and an image of the original document.

Kent, Canterbury Archdeaconry Banns
An additional 2,416 records covering Chilham, Stalisfield & Staple are now available to search within our collection of Kent, Canterbury Archdeaconry Banns.

Kent, Canterbury Archdeaconry Marriages
Add another branch to your family tree by uncovering vital information about your ancestor's spouse with over 6,000 new Canterbury Archdeaconry Marriages.

Kent, Canterbury Archdeaconry Burials
Explore over 9,000 records from the parishes of Chilham, Stalisfield and Staple to determine where your Kent ancestors were laid to rest.

PERiodical Source Index image update
Images have been added to the following titles:
•NewsLeaf, (2012-2013)
•Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine, (1918-1923)
•William and Mary Quarterly Historical Magazine, (1892-1923)
•Wisconsin Magazine of History, (1917-1924)
•Women's Canadian Historical Society of Toronto Transactions, (1896-1923)
•Wyoming Historical and Genealogical Society Proceedings and Collections, (1858-1922)
•Yorkshire County Magazine, (1891-1894)

British Newspaper Update
New titles now available to search include:
•Whitchurch Herald
•Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard
•The Atlas
•Winsford & Middlewich Guardian
•Chard and Ilminster News
•Paisley & Renfrewshire Gazette
•Worthing Herald
•Denbighshire Free Press
•Barking, East Ham & Ilford Advertiser, Upton Park and Dagenham Gazette
•Loughborough Monitor
•Cardigan & Tivy-side Advertiser
•Leigh Journal and Times
•Thame Gazette
•Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports General Advertiser
•Darlington & Stockton Times, Ripon & Richmond Chronicle
•Hants and Berks Gazette and Middlesex and Surrey Journal

Further details at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-2496057384.html

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.