Friday, 24 June 2016

India Office Records sessions at British Library

From the Families in British India Society (www.fibis.org):

Readers might be interested in these useful free training sessions being held at the British Library this summer on using India Office Records family history sources.


Introduction to family history sources in Asian and African Studies

‘Introduction to family history sources in Asian and African Studies’ training sessions are aimed at new or inexperienced users. Free; lasting ca. 75 minutes; book via hrs-training@bl.uk.

Dates
27 July
22 August
27 September


Researching Ancestors in the Army in India

Asian and African Studies Reference Services working in tandem with the Families In British India Society (FIBIS) are delighted to present specialized sessions looking at biographical sources for military personnel. No previous knowledge of the subject is expected or required. If, therefore, you believe you have European ancestors who served in the Indian sub-continent whether as officers or private soldiers, please book your free place by contacting hrs-training@bl.uk.

Dates
5 September

(With thanks to Valmay Young)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Claiming an Irish passport

In the wake of the UK's gut-wrenchingly shocking decision to vote for a withdrawal from the EU, a reminder of a couple of real time posts from last week on how to claim dual nationality with an Irish passport, which may be of some use to readers.

Part One: http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2016/06/claiming-irish-passport-1.html

Part Two: http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2016/06/claiming-irish-passport-part-2.html

Part 3 will be posted early next week.

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Yorkshire Family History Fair

From The Genealogist  (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

Yorkshire Family History Fair
Saturday 2nd July 2016
10am to 4.30pm
The Knavesmire Exhibition Centre, The Racecourse, York, YO23 1EX


The second largest Family History Fair in the UK is in its 21st year. With exhibitors from all over the UK and Ireland many family history societies and companies attend each year.

You don't have to have Yorkshire Ancestors to come to this fair - they can be from anywhere at all. Everyone is very welcome and there is lots to see. There is plenty of parking, refreshments are available all day, with exhibitors on two floors and FREE talks held throughout the day.

This event is organised by family historians for family historians. Do you really know who you are? Come and find out - you may be surprised.

Chose between two great ticket offers on www.yorkshirefamilyhistoryfair.com
FREE gift when you pre-book tickets Claim your Discover Your Ancestors Issue 4 and Discover Your Ancestors Compendium (worth £17.94) at the show

Or

Buy One Ticket and Get One Free
(offers valid until Wednesday 29th June at midday BST)

See you at The Knavesmire Exhibition Centre, The Racecourse, York, YO23 1EX.

Admission: Adults £4.80, Children under 14 FREE
For late availability on exhibitor space contact stanley@merridews.freeserve.co.uk

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Thursday, 23 June 2016

Ancestry adds Niagara Falls honeymoon records

Here's a fun new collection on Ancestry - did your ancestors go to Niagara Falls in Ontario, Canada, on their honeymoon?! Here's the blurb:

Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada, Honeymoon and Visitor Registers, 1949-2011
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=60714

Niagara Falls, formed by the forces of nature more than 12,000 years ago, was discovered by French explorer Father Louis Hennepin in 1678. Tourism to the falls began in the early 1800s. Initially, visitors traveled to the falls by boat. As railroads expanded across North America in the 1800s, eventually the Niagara Railway Suspension Bridge was built in 1855, but boats remained the main route for tourists to visit the falls until their use was gradually superseded in the early 1900s by automobiles, buses, and trains.

Niagara Falls received its reputation as the “Honeymoon Capital of the World” in 1801, when Theodosia Burr Alston (daughter of the 3rd Vice President of the United States, Aaron Burr) chose to honeymoon at the falls. Napoleon Bonaparte’s brother, Jerome Bonaparte, did the same in 1804, starting a popular tradition that continues to this day. Today, approximately 50,000 newly-wed couples visit Niagara Falls each year. Many choose to sign their names in register books that are kept by the Niagara Falls Tourism Office, which have been digitized and indexed for this collection.


The source for the collection is given as Niagara Falls Honeymoon Registries. Niagara Falls Tourism Office, Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada, with the records indexed as part of the World Archives Project.

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

National Archives of Ireland places Seán MacDiarmada's will online

The National Archives of Ireland (www.nationalarchives.ie) has placed the last will of Seán MacDiarmada online as its document of the month for June. The document was written in Kilmainham Gaol (pictured below) on May 12th 1916, just prior to his execution for his role as one of the seven leaders of the 1916 Easter Rising.

The document can be viewed online at http://www.nationalarchives.ie/digital-resources/documents-of-the-month/2016-2/june-document-of-the-month/.

A comprehensive summary of post-1858 surviving Irish wills, inventories and probate calendars is available on this blog in a dedicated accessible from the top menu, or directly via http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/ireland-probate-calendars.html.


Don't forget also that my book A Decade of Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923 can also help to locate additional resources for family history research within one of Ireland's most tumultuous periods. See http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html for details on how to access copies worldwide or in ebook format.

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

TNA podcast: Campaign for Homosexual Equality history

The latest podcast from the National Archives in England (www.nationalarchives.gov.uk) is entitled Amiable Warriors: A History of the Campaign for Homosexual Equality, a 46 minute talk by playwright and journalist Peter Scott-Presland on the history of the oldest surviving LGBT organisation in the UK.

The podcast can be listened to at http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/amiable-warriors-history-campaign-homosexual-equality/ or downloaded for free from iTunes.

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

National Archives of Australia podcasts

You mean that you didn't know that the National Archives of Australia (www.naa.gov.au) had its own podcasts series? Fair enough, neither did I!

Amongst the areas covered are family history, war
and social history, with lectures as diverse as the Dutch in Australia 1606-2006, Australian civil internees of the Japanese, family and local history sources in postal records, woman transported: myth and reality, the Australian Light Horse, shining the light on persoanl war experiences, anbd much, much more.

You can access the archive's library of podcasts at http://www.naa.gov.au/collection/publications/papers-and-podcasts/index.aspx - enjoy!

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Wednesday, 22 June 2016

AncestryDNA passes two million people tested

Ancestry has announced that it has now tested more than 2 million people through its AncestryDNA service. The full announcement is at http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2016/06/22/2-million-people-strong/, with further commentary at http://dna.ancestry.com/lp/genetic-testing-news.

I sent my own test off to the company a few weeks ago and so should hopefully be receiving my results fairly soon. It will be interesting to see what they suggest.

Chris


For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Prominent Northern Irish family historian commemorated

From the North of Ireland Family History Society (www.nifhs.org):

Posthumous presentation to family of late Randal Gill to mark his election as a Fellow of the Irish Genealogical Research Society – recognising his decades of dedicated service to the genealogy community in Northern Ireland and further afield.

On Saturday, 18th June 2016, at the Library and Research Centre of the North of Ireland Family History Society (NIFHS) in Newtownabbey, a posthumous presentation was made to the family of the late Randal Gill, a founder member and former President of the Society, to mark his election as a Fellow of the Irish Genealogical Research Society (www.irishancestors.ie) which he had been a member of since 1982. The Award of Fellowship was made to recognise Randal’s outstanding contribution to genealogy across the province of Ulster.

Without doubt, Randal is recognised in Irish genealogical circles as having made an immensely significant contribution to the development of Ulster genealogical knowledge and resources for over forty years. Randal‘s pursuit of family history began in 1967 when a cousin from Australia visited Northern Ireland and together they began to research the family of Randal’s mother. This soon ignited his interest in the Gill family and thus began a lifelong fascination of genealogy and family history.

In 1979, Randal was one of the founding members of the North of Ireland Family History Society, serving in various roles, including twice as president of the Society. His enthusiasm for Ulster family history drove him to be a most generous individual with his time and knowledge. He thought nothing of travelling the length and breadth of the North of Ireland, attending NIFHS branch meetings and giving informative talks, which were often highly entertaining. His biggest contribution to the NIFHS was the building up of its library to be one of the most important resources for Ulster genealogy and local history. It was fitting then, that after his untimely and sudden death in 2012, that the NIFHS named their library 'The Randal Gill Library'.

At the event, IGRS President, Fergus Gillespie, former Chief Herald of Ireland, said: “Our pleasure in recognising Randal Gill’s unique contribution to Irish genealogy in early 2012, with his election as a Fellow of the IGRS, was overtaken by sadness when we learned of his premature death so shortly afterwards. Randal’s work in promoting Ulster genealogy and the North of Ireland Family History Society was unrivalled. He was without doubt a most knowledgeable and generous individual and a man most deserving of this Fellowship.”

Ann Robinson, NIFHS president, said “Randal was for years a vital part of our Society and his sudden death in 2012 was a great loss to us, as both a committed member and as a friend to so many. We are very pleased that Randal's family are here with us today to accept the Fellowship on his behalf. It is wonderful that this presentation recognises his important contribution to family history across the North of Ireland for over four decades. His legacy lives on in a network of family history branches and in the library materials that are available to family and local history researchers worldwide.”


(With thanks to the NIFHS)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Monday, 20 June 2016

DNA evidence resolves baronetcy inheritance claim in Scotland

DNA evidence has overturned an inheritance claim in a ruling that could have profound implications for similar cases within the aristocratic and landed classes in Britain, and perhaps beyond.

An accountant from High Wycombe called Murray Pringle and a businessman from Hastings, Simon Pringle, had both claimed the right to inherit the baronetcy of Pringle of Stichill, near Kelso in the Scottish Borders. The original baronetcy had been granted by the Crown to Robert Pringle of Stichill and all "male heirs from his body" in January 1683. When the 10th baronet died in 2013, the two claimants, who are second cousins once removed, asserted their right to inherit.

Murray Pringle's case was based on the allegation that Simon Pringle's grandfather, Norman Pringle, the 9th Baronet, was not a son of the 8th baronet of the same name - whereas the 9th baronet's brother Ronald, father to Murray Pringle, was a legitimate son. Seven judges at the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council in London, asked to intervene by the British Queen (see my previous post at http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2015/10/dna-tests-may-upset-blue-blooded.html), had ruled that DNA testing was perfectly legitimate as a means to resolve the dispute. The test results have now confirmed that Simon Pringle is not a male line descendant of the 8th baronet, and thus has no claim as a 'male heir of his body' to inherit; the same tests have shown that Murray Pringle is the legitimate heir, as his DNA confirms his descent.

For the full story, visit http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-south-scotland-36576672 and http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/06/20/accountant-wins-legal-claim-to-baronetcy-in-unusual-cuckoo-in-th/.

The full judgment itself is available at https://www.jcpc.uk/cases/jcpc-2015-0079.html.

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.