Tuesday, 20 February 2018

Free access to Ancestry's UK and Irish records

From Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk), a free weekend's access to UK and Irish records:

FREE ACCESS 23-25 FEBRUARY*
Banish those winter blues – make the most of free access to Ancestry

Starting this Friday, we're giving you free access* to all our UK and Irish records for three whole days.*

*Access to the records in the featured collections will start on 23 February 2018 and will be free until 25 February 2018 at 23:59 GMT. To view these records you will need to register for free with Ancestry.co.uk with your name and email address. We will then send you a username and password to access the records. After the free access period ends, you will only be able to view the records in the featured collections using an Ancestry.co.uk paid membership.

To see a full list of the records in the featured collections please visit https://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/group/uk_irish_records.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Monday, 19 February 2018

New County Fermanagh research guide from NIFHS

County Fermanagh in Ireland is an area that keeps yielding surprises for my own family history research. A couple of years back I discovered that a four times great grandfather, William Halliday, was born in Enniskillen (in about 1797); elsewhere, in Magheraculmoney parish, my Morrow family have stories slowly being uncovered, whilst my Mitchell ancestors from Breagho townland in Enniskillen recently yielded one of my biggest DNA successes yet, when it turned out that just about all of the family emigrated to Boston, Massachussetts, in the mid-19th century - with the exception of my two times great gran, who made her way to Scotland!

It is fair to say that Fermanagh is my as yet untapped genealogical frontier. Thankfully, with almost Jedi like insight, the North of Ireland Family History Society seems to have sensed this and produced the perfect research guide to help me out.

Co. Fermanagh is the fifth county based guide in the Researching Your Ancestors in the North of Ireland book series produced by the society. At 49 pages in total, and in full colour throughout, it packs a lot in with regards to maps, background information, and information on those all important resources for ancestral research.

The opening pages priovide a background to Fermanagh's topography and history, including information on the town of Enniskillen and the village of Pettigo, half of which is in fact in Co. Donegal, followed by an overview of some of the 'usual suspects', such as Griffith's Valuation and the Registry of Deeds. The section on 17th, 18th and 19th century census substitutes includes many useful links, followed by information on the census itself, with some limited returns for 1821, 1841 and 1851 surviving, prior to the full returns for 1901 and 1911.

The section on Church Records, listing what records have survived and where to find them, forms the main heart of the book, followed by detailed information on Gravestone Inscriptions, Estates Records and records from the Plantations. Various supplemetary records collections are further discussed, with notable sections on Newspapers, Directories, Grand Jury records, School Records, and Workhouses, followed by a detailed bibliography of Fermanagh based literature. The guide is rounded off with lists of useful contact details and websites to help further with research.

The NIFHS county guides are turning into a very useful library collection if you have forebears from the north of Ireland, with additional guides already available covering Cavan, Monaghan, Tyrone and Londonderry/Derry. The price for each is £6 plus postage.

For further details, visit http://www.nifhs.org/product-category/booklets/ (NB: the Fermanagh guide is so new it has yet to be added, but give it a wee while!)

 The new Fermanagh guide went on sale at Back To Our Past in Belfast.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Sunday, 18 February 2018

Ancestry adds London directories and East India Company records

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has added a new collection of London directories and records of interest for India - here are the descriptions:

London, England, City Directories, 1736-1943
https://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61265
Source: London Directories held by the London Metropolitan Archives, London, England. Images produced by permission of the City of London Corporation. The City of London gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to London Metropolitan Archives, 40 Northampton Road, London EC1R 0HB (email: ask.lma@cityoflondon.gov.uk). Infringement of the above condition may result in legal action.

About London, England, City Directories, 1736-1943

This database is a collection of directories for London from 1736 to 1943. Various types of directories exist, including:
  • Street: listing of residents, businesses, and tradesmen according to street address
  • Commercial: includes businesses, but may also include private residences; generally an alphabetical listing of traders
  • Trade: not just for businesses, but anyone with a recognized trade or profession; an alphabetical listing of trades and businesses
  • Court: lists wealthy residents and government officials
  • Post Office: listing of householder's names and addresses

UK, Registers of Employees of the East India Company and the India Office, 1746-1939
https://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61468
Source: The Wohl Library of the Institute of Historical Research, School of Advanced Study, University of London, England, Registers of Employees of the East India company from 1707 to 1861 and the India Office from 1862 to 1947.

About These Records

The records list the employees, both civil and military, of the East India Company and later, the India Office. You may be able to find (where available):
  • Name
  • Military Rank
  • Place of residence or military service
  • Date of death
  • Place of death
  • Date of marriage
  • Name of parents


Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Saturday, 17 February 2018

Back To Our Past in Belfast - review

I’m on way back to Scotland after a fun day in Belfast at the Back To Our Past (www.backtourpast.ie) event at Titanic Belfast. This was the first time the event had come north from Dublin, and the first major family history event I have ever attended back home in Northern Ireland. So how did it go?


When I arrived at the venue, I have to say that there was little by way of direction in terms of how to get to the event, which was held on the fifth floor of the building. There was a table on the busy ground floor where an attendant handed me a copy of the Belfast Telegraph family history supplement, before pointing me to the lift. But outside the building there was nothing to indicate that a family history event was happening at all, and so it seemed there was little to lure in the casual passers by who might have been tempted to pop in.

This was only my second time in the Titanic Belfast building - and on my previous event I had only been to the attraction’s shop. Once on the fifth floor I was pleasantly surprised to see the event itself was held in the same room where the famous Titanic replica staircase is based - so I obviously had to get the relevant photographs!


On the genie front, I briefly bumped into John Reid from the Canada’s Anglo-Celtic Connections blog (http://anglo-celtic-connections.blogspot.co.uk), and then had a good catch up with Eddie Connolly of Eddie’s Extracts fame – his site has now been moved to a new domain at www.eddiesextracts.com, having been failed by the Rootsweb platform one too many times. There were many vendors from across Ireland, north and south, including PRONI (www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni), the National Archives of Ireland (www.nationalarchives.ie), the North of Ireland Family History Society (www.nifhs.org.uk), Irish Roots magazine (www.irishrootsmedia.com), the Irish Newspaper Archive (www.irishnewsarchive.com), and many more - and even a fair few folk from Scotland, including fellow Scottish Genealogy Network members (http://scottishgenealogynetwork.co.uk), from ASGRA, Scottish Monumental Inscriptions (www.scottish-monumental-inscriptions.com), and Glasgow City Archives (which now has a new Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/GlasgowCityArchives).


After a brief catch up with a few Irish friends, I gave my talk, Finding the Irish in Scotland, to a packed room – thankfully, as this was my first ever genealogy talk ever in Ireland! The talk seemed to go down well, and the few books I brought with me to sell on the back of it disappeared within minutes (noted for future reference!).


I had a chance to talk to several vendors. The Imperial War Museum (https://www.iwm.org.uk) told me that the Lives of the First World War website (https://livesofthefirstworldwar.org) will be permanently moving over to the IWM platform in spring of next year, its remit to collect ancestral stories from the conflict now almost complete. I also spoke to Niamh McCarthy, a recent textiles design graduate of the University of Ulster (I refuse to call it Ulster University!) who now makes superb custom made embroidered family trees at reasonable prices (see http://www.etsy.com/shop/NiamhDesigns), and Christine Deakin from Co. Waterford based Irish Genealogy Solutions (www.irishgenealogysolutions.com), who supplies folders, wallets, acid free paper, binders, genealogy books and more, for all your genie needs.


Janet, Stephen and crew from PRONI were having a rare auld time, constantly busy, as was the North of Ireland Family History Society, which I renewed my membership with (I normally do so at WDYTYA Live, but this is now defunct). The NIFHS has a new guide book out on finding Fermanagh based ancestors (which I will review separately). I also caught up with Fintan Mullen at the Ulster Historical Foundation (www.ancestryireland.com), who was equally constantly on the go - the Foundation has a new book out also on Ballymacarrett and the First World War (see http://britishgenes.blogspot.no/2018/02/ballymacarrett-and-first-world-war.html).


On the DNA front, both FamilyTreeDNA (www.familytreedna.com) and MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com) were active, and there was a separate talks stream on genetic genealogy, although I never got to listen to any of these talks (of the speakers here, I was able to catch up with Debbie Kennett and Michelle Leonard).


Overall, the event to me was perhaps a bit smaller than I was expecting, and slightly less busy than perhaps it could have been (although I was told it had been busier on Friday), but at times it was still quite busy, and the venue itself on the 5th floor was great. Of the large corporate records agencies, there was sadly no sign of Ancestry, FindmyPast or FamilySearch - but archives and societies were well represented. There was certainly an appetite for the talks (after my own talk ended, I managed to sit in on Brian Mitchell’s useful and well attended session on online resources).


Given a year or two to build up a profile in the north, this could become a good regular fixture in Belfast if vendors were inclined to return, but it did not quite have the buzz of the longer established Dublin based parent event - yet at least. It was a good first event, with lots of future potential, and certainly worth a hop over from Scotland for the day!

Here's hoping the event returns again to the north next year...


(With thanks to Maeve Rogan from the NIFHS for the use of one of the attached pics)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Friday, 16 February 2018

Finding the Irish in Scotland

Back To Our Past (http://backtoourpast.ie) kicks off today in Belfast!

A reminder that I will be giving a talk tomorrow (Saturday 17th) at the event entitled Finding the Irish in Scotland:

From the vital records and censuses, to records of hardship and success, the impact of the Irish in Scotland has been well and truly documented. In his first talk in Northern Ireland, genealogist Chris Paton, originally from Carrickfergus but resident in Scotland for over twenty years, discusses how to look for Irish settlers across the water through a variety of resources available both online and offline. 

The talk is at Titanic Belfast at 12.30 - I'll hopefully see a few of you there!

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

More Scottish monumental inscriptions added to FindmyPast

This week's update to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk) includes:


Aberdeenshire, Banffshire & Kincardineshire Monumental Inscriptions
Over 21,000 records have been added to our collection of Aberdeenshire, Banffshire & Kincardineshire Monumental Inscriptions. The new additions cover 19 kirkyards across all three historic counties and consist of transcripts provided by the Aberdeen & North-East Scotland Family History Society.

Norfolk, Electoral Registers 1832-1915 Image Browse
Browse through images of electoral registers from Norfolk, England, covering the years 1832 to 1915. The collection consist of 290 volumes containing over 161,000 records and can be searched by year, division, or borough. The registers will reveal your ancestors place of abode, qualification, and address. This collection has been obtained from FamilySearch.

Yorkshire Parish Records
We've added thousands of new additions to our collection of Yorkshire parish records, including:
Over 73,000 additional Yorkshire baptisms
Over 16,000 additional Yorkshire banns
Over 57,000 additional Yorkshire marriages
Over 18,000 additional Yorkshire burials

Nottinghamshire Burial Index
Additional records covering Catholic burials in Worksop have been added to the Nottinghamshire Burial Index. The index now holds more than 678,000 records from 1569 through 1905.

Connecticut, Town of Sharon Cemetery Indexes
Explore more than 4,000 transcripts of headstone inscriptions from eight cemeteries in Sharon, Connecticut. From these indexes you can discover your ancestor's birth year, death date, and burial place. This collection has been obtained from the sharonhist.org website. Additional information about the records can we found on the source's website.

For further details and links visit https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-february-16th-2535007461.html

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Eddie's Extracts new web address

Having previously been hosted on Rootsweb, the popular Northern Irish website Eddie's Extracts now has a new web address at www.eddiesextracts.com. On this you will find indexes and abridgements of newspaper articles, records orf deceased seamen, military rolls of honour, parish records, and more.

Have fun exploring!

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Thursday, 15 February 2018

Cornwall parish records indexes added to FamilySearch

From FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org):

New Historic Records on FamilySearch: Week of February 12, 2018

Find your ancestors on FamilySearch with new historic records published this week from BillionGraves, Colombia, Denmark, Ecuador, England, Panama, Russia, and Slovakia. Search these new free records by clicking on the collection links below or search over 5 billion free records at FamilySearch.

Collection
Indexed Records
Digital Images
Comments
266,700
266,700
Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
104,800
0
Added indexed records to an existing collection
38,635
0
Added indexed records to an existing collection
70,866
0
Added indexed records to an existing collection
496,943
0
Added indexed records to an existing collection
265,029
0
Added indexed records to an existing collection
1,032,510
0
Added indexed records to an existing collection
23,310
9,394
Added indexed records and images to an existing collection


Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world's historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Tuesday, 13 February 2018

Free access to MyHeritage marriage records for Valentine's Day

From MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com):

Hi Chris,

We wanted you to know that to celebrate Valentine’s Day, MyHeritage has a special gift for everyone.

From now through February 15, all MyHeritage marriage records will be available for free, no data subscription will be required.

Enjoy your search, and please let us know what you discover.

Happy Valentine's Day!


To view the records visit https://www.myheritage.com/research/category-2020/marriage-divorce

(With thanks to Daniel Horowtiz)

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

RootsTech 2018 Announces Free Online Broadcast Schedule

From FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org):

Popular RootsTech 2018 Announces Free Online Broadcast Schedule

Mark your calendars! RootsTech, the world’s largest family history and technology conference, happening February 28 to March 3, 2018, announced its free live online streaming schedule. It will broadcast 19 of its popular sessions, including former Olympic gold-medalist Scott Hamilton; Brandon Stanton, founder of the Humans of New York photo blog; host of the popular PBS show Finding Your Roots, Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr.; Natalia Lafourcade, internationally recognized singer songwriter; and Steve Rockwood, CEO of FamilySearch International. The live broadcasts give those unable to attend in-person a sampling of the show's marquee content. Interested viewers can watch the select broadcasts live at RootsTech.org. No registration is required to view the live streams.

"RootsTech 2018 offers over 300 sessions for those able to attend in-person," said Tyler Stahle, RootsTech marketing manager. "However, the 19 sessions we will live stream for free will expand the show's reach and give more people the opportunity to participate remotely in this world class conference." In 2017, streaming sessions garnered more than 50,000 views, and that number continues to grow each year.

The streamed sessions will include the popular general sessions and a sampling of technology and family history presentations appealing to varied interests.

RootsTech Live Streaming Schedule

Watch at www.RootsTech.org. No registration is required to view the live streams. All times are in Mountain Standard Time (MST).

For the full schedule of talks, please visit https://media.familysearch.org/popular-rootstech-2018-announces-free-online-broadcast-schedule/

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.