Friday, 20 October 2017

Kirkcaldy Poor Law records on Ancestry

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has added some poor law records from Kirkcaldy in Fife, Scotland, to its site.

Kikcaldy, Fife, Scotland, Poor Law Records, 1888-1912
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61428
Source: Abden Poorhouse Record Book, Fife Library and Archives Service, Fife, Scotland.

About Kikcaldy, Fife, Scotland, Poor Law Records, 1888-1912

This collection contains Poor Law Union Records for Kikcaldy, Fife, Scotland ranging from 1888-1912. It includes records for those who received help from the Abden Home Poor Law Institution, originally named the Kirkcaldy Combination Poorhouse.

Details vary depending on record type, but you might find facts such as:

Name
Date of admission
Date of discharge
Reason discharged
Occupation
Gender
Marital status
Religion
Age
Date of death


The record page unfortunately has a collection description which is just completely wrong, discussing the implementation of the poor law system in England from 1601 and 1834.

At the risk of sounding like a broken record... Scotland is not England!

The Old Poor Law Act in Scotland was passed in 1579, whilst the Poor Law (Scotland) Amendment Act provisions did not commence until 1845. There were never any Boards of Guardians involved in Scotland, instead, we had parochial boards which answered to a Board of Supervision in Edinburgh.

Ancestry may well wish to revisit this description....!

UPDATE 21 OCT: Ancestry has revisited the Historical Context description, and replaced a few paragraphs on the English poor law system with the following extremely short description of Scotland's set up:

"After the Poor Law Scotland Act of 1845, Scottish parishes were able to establish institutions to care for the poor, house them and give out relief. Whilst there was a Central Supervising body, each institution was locally run."

If you need a wee bit more on how Scotland's set up actually existed, do check out my book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis (see http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html)!

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

NSW Colonial Secretary's Letters 1826-1856 join Ancestry

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has added a new Australian collection, indexed as part of its World Archives Project:

New South Wales, Australia, Colonial Secretary's Letters, 1826-1856
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61481
Source: State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.

The collection New South Wales, Australia, Colonial Secretary's Letters, 1826-1856 consist mainly of copies of letters to the Principle Superintendent of Convicts and to the Land Board in relation to the assignment of convict servants. Letters and records of various events make up the majority of the collections: petitions by convicts for sentence mitigation, marriage permission requests, character memorials for potential settlers, land grant or lease applications, official visit reports, information about court cases, and lists of assigned servants. These files were organized by the Colonial Secretary, or Secretary to the Governor of New South Wales.

The colony of New South Wales is located on the south-east coast of Australia and became a state of the Commonwealth of Australia in 1901. Prior to that date it was a British colony whose first settlement was a penal colony governed by Captain Arthur Phillip in 1788. During the time period of this collection, 1788 through 1856, 10 different governors were assigned to the colony, which existed in a steady state of anarchy until the appointment of Governor Lachlan Macquarie, who cracked down on active rebellion leaders and built local infrastructure in the form of roads, wharves, churches, and public buildings. Mentioned in this collection is Governor William Bligh. An officer of the British Royal Navy, he had the reputation of a firm disciplinarian and was appointed the fourth governor of New South Wales in 1805 with the assignment to straighten out the colony and clean up the corrupt rum trade. He was deposed in 1808 by a group of settlers in what is known as the Rum Rebellion, and held captive until 1810.

Within these records you can find significant information about your ancestors if they lived or immigrated to New South Wales during this time period. If they requested to marry, resettle in New South Wales, or acquire a land grant these requests would have been processed by the colonial secretary or other administrative personnel. For more general information about Australian records and research see Searching for Roots Down Under by Janet Reakes in the Learning Center. This article provides a short history of the settlement of Australia, suggests other databases on the Ancestry.com site to search, and includes a brief summary of the kinds of records you can look for in order to further your research.

Information in this database:

Given name
Surname
Event date
Event description

This collection is only partially indexed but all of the images may be viewed using the browse.

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Thrift Genealogical Abstracts added to FindmyPast

Several Irish themed collections have been added to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.com) this week:

Thrift Genealogical Abstracts

Containing over 150,000 records, the Thrift genealogical abstracts were created by renowned genealogist, Gertrude Thrift, at the turn of the last century. Findmypast's exclusive access to Thrift's abstracts provides a vast amount of genealogical material dating back to the 1500s. Thrift transcribed and created detailed notes from military commission books, parish registers, exchequer bill books, prerogative grants, chancery bill books, freeman rolls, wills, and more. Many of the wills copied within this collection were lost during the fire at the Public Record Office of Ireland in Dublin in 1922.

Thrift also constructed comprehensive family trees for names such as Gennys, Read, Jagoe, Seymour, Rainsford, and Guinness. In the records, you will find twelve pages of the Guinness family tree, beginning with Richard and Elizabeth Guinness, the parents of the famous brewer Arthur Guinness. The tree traces multiple lines and each name includes an annotation of the person's birth and death dates, occupation, accomplishments, and marital status.


Crossle Genealogical Abstracts

The Crossle Genealogical abstracts were created in the 19th century by Dr Francis Crossle and his son Philip. Containing over 657,000 Irish records, this rich genealogical resource contains valuable copies of prerogative court wills from 1620 to 1804, which were destroyed in the fire at the Public Record Office in Dublin in 1922.

Crossle also provides a wealth of material for those tracing military ancestors including yearly Army returns from 1767 through to 1816 and is an excellent resource for those tracing their ancestors in Northern Ireland.


Betham Genealogical Abstracts

Explore abstracts and genealogical sketches created by herald Sir William Betham. Containing over 489,000 records, these notebooks are an excellent substitute for missing records and include abstracts of wills, reconstructed family trees and detailed pedigrees that can be searched by name, year, or keyword.


Cork, Pobble O'Keefe Census 1830-1852

Search over 4,000 records from seven local censuses - 1830, 1834, 1836, 1849, 1850, 1851, and 1852 - from the townland Pobble O'Keefe in Cork to discover who your ancestor was living with as well as their occupation, birth year and marital status.


Yorkshire Burials

More than 75,000 new Yorkshire burial records are now available to search and explore. Yorkshire burials covers the three historic Yorkshire counties as well as records from Quaker and Roman Catholic parishes and municipal cemeteries. The collection allows you to search records from ten Yorkshire archives and family histor
y societies that will reveal your ancestors age at death, birth year, burial date, and burial place.

Further details are available at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-2498844701.html

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

How did medieval people walk?!

I love a bit of quirky, I do!

The following video popped up on my timeline, having been shared in a blogpost by Kelly Faircloth at https://pictorial.jezebel.com/this-video-of-how-medieval-people-walked-is-oddly-compe-1819217663. It features a German gent by the name of Cornelius Berthold addressing an issue that I was never even aware of before - the fact that in the medieval period, people walked in a very different way to how they do today. It was all down to the footwear!

Enjoy...!



(Also available at https://youtu.be/EszwYNvvCjQ)

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Archive conservation work

There are two good articles online today discussing the work of conservators in preserving and repairing archive based material.

First, the National Records of Scotland blog has a post at https://blog.nrscotland.gov.uk/2017/10/20/conservation-for-the-nation/, written by NRS conservator Gloria Conti, detailing the work of the facility's Conservation Services Branch in Edinburgh.


Elsewhere, the National Archives in England has a blog post online at http://blog.nationalarchives.gov.uk/blog/banishing-bulk-conserving-17th-century-volume/ detailing the specific conservation work applied to a 17th century binding of a documents collection from the weirdly and wonderfully named Office of First Fruits and Tenths and the Court of Augmentations, within the Exchequer records held at the facility.

For a great story on a further successful conservation effort, don't forget to visit the website of the Great Parchment Book project at www.greatparchmentbook.org, including the wonderful video on its homepage showing how this important work concerning the Ulster Plantations was rescued after severe fire damage.

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Wednesday, 18 October 2017

MyHeritage DNA on Good Morning Britain

MyHeritage's Aaron Godfrey was on the UK programme Good Morning Britain promoting the company's DNA testing service. The following is the clip...



(Also available at https://youtu.be/qvNSazbIZGk)

From a family history research point of view, Aaron shows that the company's DNA testing kit is useful for establishing cousin connections, highlighting matches in Susanna Reid's DNA profile with cousins in Scotland and Denmark. There is also some seriously cringeworthy discussion on ethnicity, not least with tabloid presenter Piers Morgan's conclusions on his findings - if you can skip through his bits, you'll probably enjoy it more!

For more on DNA testing through MyHeritage, visit https://www.myheritage.com/dna.

(With thanks to Daniel Horowitz)

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Monday, 16 October 2017

FamilySearch Worldwide Indexing Event

FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org) is to hold a Worldwide Indexing Event from October 20th-22nd. From the press release at https://www.familysearch.org/blog/en/2017-worldwide-indexing-event/:

As in years past, the purpose of the event will be to unite the international indexing community around the common goal of making more historical records searchable online for free. Last year’s event broke the previous records with more than 100,000 indexers helping to index over 10,000,000 records.

This year, we encourage local wards to set their own goals for participation in the event. Local participation will help indexers feel more united with each other and connected with the records they are indexing.

Over 50,000 people have already signed up to participate. To have a look, practice and participate, visit the dedicated event page at https://www.familysearch.org/IndexingEvent2017?icid=bl-wi17-6598.

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotlhttps://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.
and 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at

Saturday, 14 October 2017

Tracing your Irish and Scots-Irish Ancestors conference 2018

From the Ulster Historical Foundation (www.ancestryireland.com):

Tracing your Irish and Scots-Irish Ancestors: A Family History Conference
05-12 September 2018

Celebrate 300 years and more of migration, and mark the tercentenary of the 1718 migration with visits to sites and places synonymous with the migration of Ulster and Irish families to the New Worlds (North America, Australasia, South Africa etc).

During our 7 day conference you will be able to shape your own experiences by choosing to either research in the different archives in Belfast and Dublin or join our staff on daily excursions through Ireland's beautiful landscape to some of its most historic sites.

Trips during our 2018 programme will see you embark on a guided through the Bann Valley, the area in Ulster most directly associated with the 1718 migration; walk on the walls and explore the historic port city of Derry/Londonderry, one of the finest examples of a walled city in Europe; uncover the stories of some of the earliest people to travel from Ulster to Australia at the Down Museum; visit the Ulster American Folk Park which is dedicated to the story of emigration from Ulster to North America in the 18th and 19th centuries; as well as delving deeper into the past with visits to the Hill of the O’Neill in Dungannon to learn about the 'Flight of the Earls' in 1607, when two of Ulster's leading lords left the island for Continental Europe, never to return and Barons Court, the magnificent seat of the Duke of Abercorn whose ancestors migrated from Scotland over 400 years ago.

These tours are also enlivened with visits to other renowned historical sites of interest across the island of Ireland as you will journey into pre-history to marvel at the UNESCO World Heritage site at Newgrange and look out onto the North Atlantic Ocean from the stones of the Giant’s Causeway.

You will also be able to visit Kilmainham Gaol, one of Dublin city’s most important monuments and visitor attractions and view the beautifully illustrated Book of Kells at Trinity College. All this and much much more!

To see what else is new in our 2018 programme go to: www.ancestryireland.com/family-history-conference/autumn/new-for-2018/

Early Bird Offer

Avail now of our early bird registration offer of only £899.99 (GBP) ($1187 approx.), giving a saving of £50 on the full price of £949.99 (GBP).

Places can fill up fast so reserve your place now, with a deposit of only £299.99 (GBP) per person!

Given the current low value of sterling (GBP) against other currencies now is a particularly good time for overseas visitors to purchase. The present exchange rate values will ensure overseas delegates can make a very tidy saving on the cost.

For more information go to www.ancestryireland.com/family-history-conference/autumn

Or if you have any queries, email: enquiry@uhf.org.uk

Need Help with your Family History Research?

For those of you who are thinking about attending our Tracing your Irish Ancestors conference we would highly recommend the following publications to help you prepare for your time with us.

Researching Scots-Irish Ancestors: The Essential Genealogical Guide to Early Modern Ulster, 1600-1800 by Dr William Roulston – This book is invaluable if you are researching ancestors prior to 1800 from the nine counties of the province of Ulster.

Tracing Your Irish Ancestors by John Grenham – This is the essential guide to researching your Irish roots.

Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians by Chris Paton – This book gives excellent practical guidance on how to exploit online resources.

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Friday, 13 October 2017

Judy G. Russell on the ethics of genetic genealogy

This is such a great wee video that it is worth sharing further! Genealogist Amy Johnson Crow has interviewed the US based 'Legal Genealogist', Judy G. Russell (www.legalgenealogist.com) about the ethics of genetic genealogy - the things to be wary of when taking a DNA test. Amy's original blog post is at https://www.amyjohnsoncrow.com/ethics-genetic-genealogy/, with the YouTube hosted video also displayed here:



Some great points to take on board - thanks to both Amy and Judy.

(With thanks to Jenna Mills for flagging it up for me on Google Plus)

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

London and Kent records added to FindmyPast

Latest additions from FindmyPast (www.findmypast.com):

London, Docklands and East End Baptisms, 1558-1933
Over 40,000 records covering the parishes St John Wapping, St Leonard Bromley, St Mary Bow & St Mary Whitechapel have been added to our collection of London, Docklands and East End Baptisms.

London, Docklands and East End Marriages, 1558-1859
Over 10,000 additional records have been added to London, Docklands and East End Marriages, 1558-1859. Covering the parishes of St John Bethnal Green, St John Wapping, St Leonard Bromley, St Luke Limehouse and St Mary Whitechapel, the new additions consists of transcripts of original Parish registers.

Greater London Burial Index
Over 35,000 new records covering Clerkenwell in central London have been added to the Greater London Burials Index. The Index contains over 1.6 million names from more than 230 parishes in the Greater London area and includes records from both Anglican and non-conformist parishes. The index City of London Burials, Middlesex Memorial Inscriptions, the Middlesex & City of London Burial Index and the South London Burials Index.

Kent, Canterbury Archdeaconry Baptisms
Over 13,000 records have been added to our Collection of Canterbury Archdeaconry Baptisms. The new additions cover the parishes of Chilham, Stalisfield & Staple and each record includes both a transcript and an image of the original document.

Kent, Canterbury Archdeaconry Banns
An additional 2,416 records covering Chilham, Stalisfield & Staple are now available to search within our collection of Kent, Canterbury Archdeaconry Banns.

Kent, Canterbury Archdeaconry Marriages
Add another branch to your family tree by uncovering vital information about your ancestor's spouse with over 6,000 new Canterbury Archdeaconry Marriages.

Kent, Canterbury Archdeaconry Burials
Explore over 9,000 records from the parishes of Chilham, Stalisfield and Staple to determine where your Kent ancestors were laid to rest.

PERiodical Source Index image update
Images have been added to the following titles:
•NewsLeaf, (2012-2013)
•Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine, (1918-1923)
•William and Mary Quarterly Historical Magazine, (1892-1923)
•Wisconsin Magazine of History, (1917-1924)
•Women's Canadian Historical Society of Toronto Transactions, (1896-1923)
•Wyoming Historical and Genealogical Society Proceedings and Collections, (1858-1922)
•Yorkshire County Magazine, (1891-1894)

British Newspaper Update
New titles now available to search include:
•Whitchurch Herald
•Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard
•The Atlas
•Winsford & Middlewich Guardian
•Chard and Ilminster News
•Paisley & Renfrewshire Gazette
•Worthing Herald
•Denbighshire Free Press
•Barking, East Ham & Ilford Advertiser, Upton Park and Dagenham Gazette
•Loughborough Monitor
•Cardigan & Tivy-side Advertiser
•Leigh Journal and Times
•Thame Gazette
•Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports General Advertiser
•Darlington & Stockton Times, Ripon & Richmond Chronicle
•Hants and Berks Gazette and Middlesex and Surrey Journal

Further details at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-2496057384.html

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

New military records from TheGenealogist

From the Genealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):


Military Records

TheGenealogist is pleased to announce it has added two new record sets that will be useful for researching the First World War and Victorian soldiers.

● Part one of this release is The Worldwide Army Index for 1851, 1861 and 1871 which adds another name rich resource to the already vast Military record collections at TheGenealogist with over 600,000 records
● Also released at the same time is another 3,368 pages from The Illustrated War News covering 6 September 1916 to 10 April 1918 and adding to those previously made available for this First World War paper from 1914 to 1916

The Worldwide Army Index for 1851, 1861 and 1871

If you have not found your ancestor in the various British census returns, and you know that they may have been serving at the time in the British Army, then this new release from TheGenealogist may help you to find these elusive subjects.

Many thousands of men of the British Army were serving overseas in far flung parts of the British Empire over the 1800s. This index of names is compiled from the musters contained in the WO 10-11-12 Series of War Office Paylists, held at the National Archives, Kew. The 1851, 1861 and 1871 Worldwide Army Index lists all officers* and other ranks subjects serving in the first quarter of 1851 and second quarter of 1861 and 1871, together with their regimental HQ location. The index is, therefore, effectively a military surrogate for the relevant census.

Over 70,000 records have extra notes that can indicate whether a soldier was a recruit awaiting transfer to a regiment, detached from his regiment or attached to another, possibly discharged, on leave, had deserted or retired. Men identified as using aliases are also included. Many notes include a place of birth and former occupation.

Also included within the records are recruits, boy soldiers, bandsmen and civilians working in the armed forces as clerks, pension recruiters, teachers and suchlike. Colonial regiments which invariably had numbers of British subjects are also featured.

The Illustrated War News was a weekly magazine during the First World War, published by The Illustrated London News and Sketch Ltd. of London. The IWN publication contained illustrated reports related entirely to the war and comprised articles, photographs, diagrams and maps. From 1916 it was issued as a 40-page publication in portrait format, having been landscape prior to this. It claimed to have the largest number of artist-correspondents reporting on the progress of the war until it ceased publication in 1918.

To search these and many other records go to: https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/search/advanced/military/muster-book-pay-list/
or read our article at: https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2017/worldwide-army-index-1851-1861--1871-661/

*While the 1851 and 1871 include officers, the 1861 index excludes officers as they were not mustered in all the Paylists.

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

DNA, ethnicity, and a racist

I found the following this morning whilst browsing through Twitter, from a person ranting about immigration. The post was made on October 11th. I have hidden the identity of the tweeter (the account page is just horrendous), and also the names of two people whose DNA ethnicity images that have been appropriated to support this rant – one of whom is a friend of mine (and ironically/tragically for this idiot's thesis, not actually British). I have of course contacted my friend to alert to the misuse of this personal information, and have also alerted Ancestry via a response to this idiot's tweet.


In this example, this idiot tweeter is trying to use ethnicity profiling images to show how 'non-British' Britain is allegedly becoming, what with all this European identity mixing in with it, etc. The level of ignorance of British history is truly astonishing in this regard.

Whilst in Australia recently, I had the pleasure to travel on a talks tour with German based genealogist Dirk Weissleder about a great many issues to do with genealogy, and its perception in the UK and Germany. I have commented on some of these for a forthcoming Family Tree magazine article, but one in particular was his observation that DNA testing and genealogy is apparently not at all popular in Germany, for many reasons, including the country's recent history in which the Nazis tried to corrupt the discipline to establish so called 'Aryan' ancestry for members of its party, and because of its attitudes to ethnicity, and what it did with them. It was a fascinating conversation, and one of which I have some sympathy with, because to label any people with an ethnicity tag can be potentially dangerous. To misrepresrent such information is even more so, as history has shown.

This racist tweeter is of course not advertising Ancestry, and Ancestry cannot in any way be held liable for what this idiot has used its imagery for. I remain a fervent supporter of Ancestry's DNA testing service and its cousin connection service. For those doing tests though, there are things to learn. Be careful with how and where you display your ethnicity results (I am as guilty with my own, as I am sure I have shared my own images at some point in reviews), be careful with what conclusions you draw from such results – and be careful not to allow others, as in this case, to make statements and conclusions using your results to reinforce their own warped agendas.

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Thursday, 12 October 2017

English and Welsh GRO PDF certificate service trial returns

The GRO for England and Wales has launched another trial period from today for the ordering of PDF versions of English and Welsh birth and death certificates. Here is the announcement:

General Register Office (GRO) - PDF Extended Pilot

The GRO is piloting a service from 12 October 2017 to provide portable document format (PDF) copies of digitised historical birth and death records. The pilot will run for a minimum of 3 months to enable GRO to assess the demand for this service over a prolonged period.

Applications for each PDF cost £6, must be made online, and include a GRO index reference.

England and Wales records which are available as PDFs in this extended pilot include:

Births: 1837 –1916
Deaths: 1837 –1957

To order records visit https://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certificates/default.asp

(With thanks to Michelle Leonard via Twitter)

UPDATE: From the Rootschat website (http://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=780525.0):

"There is a slight change to the previous trial - once produced, the pdf will be available to download from your account page on the GRO site for a period of time (in the same way that probate service wills are delivered) rather than sent as an email attachment."

(With thanks to AnthonyMMM on Rootschat)

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Tuesday, 10 October 2017

ScotlandsPeople releases 1935 Valuation Rolls online

The ScotlandsPeople website (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk) has released the 1935 Valuation Rolls for the Scotland, which includes more than 2.7 million names. The full news release is available at https://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/article/news-valuation-rolls-1935-go-online.

With this release the available rolls on the site cover the years 1855, 1865, 1875, 1885, 1895, 1905, 1915, 1920, 1925, 1930 and 1935 - though please note that the rolls are in fact annual from 1855-1989, with many others available for consultation at the National Records of Scotland, and local archives across the country.

A guide detailing how they can be used is available at https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/research/guides/valuation-rolls.

(NB: The database at the ScotlandsPeople Centre and at other family history centres hosting the same system also has the 1935 rolls up and running - I was using them earlier today at the Burns Monument Centre in Kilmarnock!)

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Monday, 9 October 2017

2018 SAFHS Conference in Fife

The 29th Scottish Association of Family History Societies (www.safhs.org) conference is to be held at the Rothes Halls, Glenrothes, Fife, on Saturday 21st April 2018, from 10am-4.30pm. The event is being organised by Fife Family History Society, which ha sset up a dedicated website at https://safhs2018.fifefhs.org.

If attending the fair only, admission will be just £2 at the door, whilst accompanied children under 12 will be admitted free. For those wishing to attend the conference, the ticket price is £20. Speakers at the event will include Andrew Campbell, Emma Maxwell, Ken Nisbet and Bruce Durie.

Further details are available via the conference website.

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

More paternity cases added to Scottish Indexes

Scottish Indexes (www.scottishindexes.com) has added more paternity cases from The Registers of Extracted Decreets from Dumfries Sheriff Court for the year 1857 to its Sheriff Court Paternity Cases index, as sourced from the National Records of Scotland.The growing collection is accessible at www.scottishindexes.com/courtsearch.aspx.

So far the registers for most Sheriff Courts in Scottish counties south of the Forth and Clyde have been completely indexed, as well as Aberdeen Sheriff Court. For more about the records visit www.scottishindexes.com/learningcourt.aspx.

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Friday, 6 October 2017

TNA podcast - the court case that banned a lesbian novel

The latest podcast from the National Archives in England is entitled Unfolding the court case that banned a 1920s lesbian novel, a 16 minute talk by Caroline Whitworth about the novel The Well of Loneliness. Here's the blurb:

In 1928 Radclyffe Hall wrote ‘The Well of Loneliness’, a novel that featured female characters in same-sex relationships. Shortly after it was published, the Sunday Express called for the book to be suppressed and urged the Home Office to censor it. Despite attempts by writers including Vera Brittain, T.S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf to defend the novel as a book of literary, sociological and psychological significance, it was banned later that year.

In this podcast, we look at files from the obscenity trial to find out why a lesbian novel that lacked any lewd imagery or language was classed as obscene. Hear what the novel meant to sexologists such as Henry Havelock Ellis; which side of the trial Rudyard Kipling offered to stand on; and the alternate plot lines that the magistrate believed would spare a novel with gay characters from censorship.

To listen to the podcast visit http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/banned-1920s-lesbian-novel/.

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

British Newspaper Archive passes 22 milion pages

The British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) has passed the 22 million pages stage, out of a proposed 40 million pages to be digitised over 10 years.

Recent releases in the last 30 days:

Dublin Evening Mail
1882, 1897-1901, 1903-1906

Birmingham Daily Post
1954, 1956

Hants and Berks Gazette and Middlesex and Surrey Journal
1892-1902

The Stage
1885-1887, 1891-1894, 1896-1897, 1902-1909, 1913-1918, 1938, 1940-1941, 2001-2007

Darlington & Stockton Times, Ripon & Richmond Chronicle
1847-1848, 1850-1851, 1853-1854, 1863, 1877, 1880, 1889, 1894

Alcester Chronicle
1889

Rugby Advertiser
1890-1896, 1898-1899, 1901-1905, 1907-1910

Carrickfergus Advertiser
1884-1910

West Sussex County Times
1875, 1890, 1901-1911, 1913-1957

Thame Gazette
1857-1869, 1873, 1875, 1877, 1928

Aberdeen Press and Journal
1963-1967, 1969-1971, 1975

Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports General Advertiser
1856, 1861

Aberdeen Evening Express
1958-1965, 1967-1971, 1975

Loughborough Monitor
1859-1867

Leigh Journal and Times
1877, 1879, 1898

Cardigan & Tivy-side Advertiser
1870, 1877, 1879

Winsford & Middlewich Guardian
1875-1887, 1889-1895, 1897-1910

Daily Herald
1911-1912, 1919-1922

Birmingham Daily Gazette
1901-1913, 1920-1925, 1927-1930, 1932-1938, 1946-1956

Barking, East Ham & Ilford Advertiser, Upton Park and Dagenham Gazette
1889-1909

Bognor Regis Observer
1890-1896, 1898-1899, 1901-1957

Londonderry Sentinel
1881-1882, 1911, 1926

Aberdeen Weekly Free Press
1872

Galloway Express
1872

Rochester, Chatham & Gillingham Journal
1908

Nottingham Journal
1910, 1953

Ardrossan and Saltcoats Herald
1854-1872, 1875-1878, 1888, 1893-1897, 1899

The Atlas
1826-1852, 1855-1869

Denbighshire Free Press
1884-1895, 1898-1910

Catholic Standard
1950

Chard and Ilminster News
1875-1886, 1888-1910

Worthing Herald
1921-1957

Bolton Evening News
1879, 1883, 1896

Paisley & Renfrewshire Gazette
1875-1876, 1878-1908

Western Daily Mercury.
1895

Athletic News
1877-1878, 1900

Woolwich Gazette
1872, 1874, 1889-1890, 1893-1894, 1904-1910

Cornish Times
1863, 1872

Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard
1837-1874, 1876-1896, 1900-1910

Islington Gazette
1902-1904

Market Harborough Advertiser and Midland Mail
1923-1950

Daily Telegraph & Courier (London)
1894, 1896, 1899, 1903-1910

Shields Daily News
1897

Weston-super-Mare Gazette, and General Advertiser
1855-1868

Whitchurch Herald
1875, 1879, 1889, 1897-1898

Eastbourne Gazette
1862-1887, 1889-1896, 1898-1905

Portadown Times
1956-1957

Bucks Advertiser & Aylesbury News
1897

Northern Constitution
1908-1910

Morecambe Guardian
1929-1935, 1938-1940, 1946, 1948-1949, 1951-1953, 1955-1957

Gravesend Reporter, North Kent and South Essex Advertiser
1886

Hexham Courant
1864, 1879, 1889, 1897

Eastbourne Herald
1951-1957

Clitheroe Advertiser and Times
1933, 1936-1957

The Sportsman
1918-1919

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

English and Canadian records additions to FindmyPast

The latest releases on FindmyPast (www.findmypast.com):

Warwickshire bastardy indexes
Containing over 5,000 records, the Warwickshire bastardy indexes consists of an assortment of bastardy applications, registers, returns and appeals spanning the years 1844 to 1914.

Berkshire Baptism Index
Over 79,000 records have been added to the Berkshire Baptism Index. Spanning the years 1538 to 1917, the collection covers over 80 parishes throughout the county and reveals details that will enable you to add another generation to your family tree. The entire collection now contains more than 219,000 records.

Berkshire Marriage Index
An additional 67,000 records have been added to our collection of Berkshire Marriage records. Covering the years 1538 to 1933, the entire collection now covers over 156 parishes across the county and contains over 315,000 records.

Berkshire Burial Index
Search over 82,000 new additions to the Berkshire Burial Index. The index now covers 190 Berkshire burial grounds, spans the years 1536 to 1966 and contains over 830,000 transcripts.

Ontario Birth Index 1860-1920
Over 334,000 records have been added to the Ontario Birth Index, a vast index of more than 2 million civil registration records. Civil registration in Canada is the responsibility of the individual provinces and territories and did not become a standard practice until the late 1800s.

Thames & Medway Baptisms
Over 22,000 records covering parishes in Greenwich, Strood, Cuxton, Bermondsey and Rotherhithe have been added to our collection of Thames & Medway Baptisms. The collection now contains over 357,000 records and covers the period 1721 to 1984.

Thames & Medway Marriages
Over 8,000 additional records covering parishes in Greenwich, Strood, Cuxton, Bermondsey and Rotherhithe have been added to Thames & Medway Marriages. The collection now contains over 145,000 records and covers the period 1750 to 1984.

Thames & Medway Burials
Over 8,000 new records from the parishes of St Alphege, Greenwich, St Nicholas, Strood and St Michael & All Angels, Cuxton are now available to search in Thames & Medway Burials.

Further details at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-october-6th-2493386234.html

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Tuesday, 3 October 2017

Final Open Day at Coventry's Electric Railway Museum

From Coventry's Electric Railway Museum (http://electricrailwaymuseum.co.uk):

Final Open Day at Coventry railway museum


Electric Railway Museum will open to the public for the final time this weekend (Sunday 8 October) with organisers promising a fitting send off for the unique Coventry heritage attraction.

Alongside rides on the Museum’s 7 ¼ inch gauge miniature railway, shunting demonstrations and the opportunity to explore its unique collection of electric railway vehicles for the last time, the site’s final Open Day will also arrive with its own Beer & Cider Festival.

In partnership with The Kentish Belle Ale House, Electric Railway Museum will be offering six draft ales, four ciders and a commemorative bottled pale ale, Third R-Ale.

Furthermore, adult visitors won’t need to draw straws as to who is the designated driver, as the Museum will be running a free vintage bus service from Coventry city centre to the site and back throughout the day.

Situated on Rowley Road on land close to Coventry Airport and the Warwickshire village of Baginton, Electric Railway Museum occupies a site earmarked for commercial development.

Landowners Coventry City Council have not renewed the Museum’s lease and, despite concerted efforts by the trustees, volunteers and wider heritage sector behind the scenes, an alternative location for the attraction has not been found.

Electric Railway Museum Chairman, Ian Brown CBE, FCILT, said:

“Despite us failing to secure a single site to house the collection, a long term home has been sourced for almost every item we are currently displaying. Once our doors close to the public on Sunday, the work of dismantling the site begins.

“Myself and the trustees have been humbled from the support of our volunteers, the general public and railways enthusiasts alike, as well as organisations such as the National Railway Museum and the Heritage Railway Association. In fact, the latter’s President, Lord Faulkner of Worcester will be attending our final Open Day to further discuss the issue of electric railway heritage and how this will be preserved following the closure and dispersal of the only such collection in the UK.”

Celebrating its 10th anniversary this year, Electric Railway Museum aims to promote the heritage of all electric trains in the UK through traction and rolling stock restoration, display and operation, along with work in gathering historically relevant technical and photographic archives.

Electric Railway Museum houses the largest private collection of electric trains in the UK and is the only railway museum in Great Britain dedicated to electric traction. A registered charity, the work of the Museum has been entirely run by volunteers and funded through donations from the public.

Despite only open to the public on selected days throughout the year, the Museum attracted more than 2,000 visitors to the region in 2016, and has already exceeded that figure in 2017.

However, the Coventry and Warwickshire Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) and joint venture partners Roxhill are hoping to move forward with revised plans for the Coventry and Warwickshire Gateway scheme. Electric Railway Museum is currently situated within the proposed site for this new development and in July this year, the attraction announced it would be forced to close if an alternative site was not found by Sunday 8 October.

Railway historian and Electric Railway Museum Trustee, Graeme Gleaves, said:

“It is with a heavy heart that Electric Railway Museum will have to close this weekend. Rest assured that we will continue to work hard behind the scenes to ensure that locomotives and rolling stock currently on our Coventry site are not endangered.

“However, we want to thank the public for all their support over the past 10 years and will be departing Coventry with our biggest Open Day ever, including a Beer & Cider Festival, free vintage buses between the Museum and city centre, and extended opening hours from 10.30am until 6.30pm.”

Elsewhere, members of the public will be able to climb aboard the Class 457 and one of the Class 309s, complete with the museum display (Museum 309), a café – serving hot and cold beverages, snacks and light bites – and the Electric Railway Museum shop.

Shunting demonstrations will be carried out throughout the day by Spondon Electric Locomotive No. 1 and 165DE Locomotive ‘Mazda’.

Visitors will be able to see the Victoria Line Signalling Centre, which showcases how trains were controlled on the London Underground line when it first opened in the late 1960s.

The display, which opened to the public last September, is housed inside the passenger accommodation area of the Museum’s Class 308 EMU vehicle and features the Victoria Line push-button control desk and line diagrams from the original control room at Cobourg Street.

Furthermore, Electric Railway Museum has two carriage bodies built for the City and South London Railway (C&SLR), the first deep-level underground ‘tube’ railway in the world and today part of London Underground’s Northern Line. The oldest carriage is a timber body on a steel underframe and dates from 1903, the other is from 1907 and, unlike earlier builds, was created all in steel, making it the oldest surviving steel frame carriage in the UK.

Volunteers will be on-hand to explain more about Electric Railway Museum’s diverse collection, which also includes British Railways Classes 307 and 308, as well as the power car for the record-breaking Advanced Passenger Train Prototype (APT-P), on loan from the National Railway Museum.

Electric Railway Museum was formed in 2007 to bring about the urgent need for a permanent home where the rich and lengthy history of electrically powered trains could be presented to the public on one site.

The collection of electric trains at the Museum’s Baginton site represents over a century of technological progress and includes examples of commuter trains, battery-electric locomotives, underground carriages, high speed express units and some of the specialist line side equipment that made them work, such as signalling and current collection apparatus.

Electric Railway Museum
Rowley Road, Near Baginton, Coventry CV3 4LE

(With thanks to Ben Goodwin) 

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Monday, 2 October 2017

Heraklion's Koules Fortress

I returned from Crete a week ago, but have been fairly tied up on a few fronts since then - no rest for the wicked! However, I took some photos at Koules Fortress on my last evening in Crete in the capital city of Heraklion, one of my fave places on the whole island, which I thought you might like to see. It's an old Venetian fortress located at the end of a pier in the city's port. For more on the fortress's history, visit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koules_Fortress


















Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

TheGenealogist adds Somerset and Dorset parish records

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

TheGenealogist Expands their Parish Record collection with the addition of 2.2 million individuals for Somerset & Dorset

TheGenealogist has released Baptism records for Somerset covering the years 1538 - 1996, along with Burial and Crematorium records for Somerset & Dorset covering 1563 - 2003. In association with Somerset & Dorset FHS, these new records cover hundreds of parishes for the counties.

Somerset and Dorset Family History Society worked with TheGenealogist to publish their records online, making over 2.2 million individuals from baptism and burial records fully searchable. Ann-Marie Wilkinson, the Chair of Somerset and Dorset FHS said:

"The Somerset & Dorset Family History Society are very pleased to be working with TheGenealogist to bring these records into the online community. Also we will be able to provide access for members to TheGenealogist from our Research Centre."

Mark Bayley, Head of Online Development at TheGenealogist, welcomed Somerset and Dorset FHS to the growing number of family history societies on both TheGenealogist and FHS-Online, saying:

“We’re delighted that Somerset and Dorset FHS chose to publish their records through TheGenealogist and FHS-Online. This release adds to the ever expanding collection of parish records on both websites. These partnerships help societies boost their funds whilst bringing their records to a much wider audience, through online publication.”

This release joins TheGenealogist’s Somerset and Dorset collection including Bishop’s Transcripts and parish records for many areas and years to form a major resource for the county.

If your society is interested in publishing records online, please contact Mark Bayley on 01722 717002 or see fhs-online.co.uk/about.php

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Saturday, 30 September 2017

Ancestry adds Derbyshire parish records collections

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has released the following parish registers collections for Derbyshire:

Derbyshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61407

Derbyshire, England, Church of England Deaths and Burials, 1813-1991
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61410

Derbyshire, England, Church of England Marriages and Banns, 1754-1932
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61409

Derbyshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, 1813-1916
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61408

The source for all collections is given as Derbyshire Church of England Parish Registers, Derbyshire Record Office, Matlock, Derbyshire, England.

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Further Warwickshire parish added to FindmyPast

The latest releases from FindmyPast (www.findmypast.com):

Warwickshire Baptisms
Over 1.1 million additional records have been added to our collection of Warwickshire Baptisms. The collection contains records from a variety of sources and many will include a scanned images of the original document. Transcripts that include an image were created by Findmypast with images that were provided courtesy of the Warwickshire County Record Office. Records that only provide a transcript have been provided by the Rugby Family History Society, Birmingham & Midland Society for Genealogy & Heraldry, and FamilySearch International's Genealogical Index. Since the collection has many sources, it is possible that you may find up to three records related to one individual.

Warwickshire Banns
Over 265,000 new records have been added to Warwickshire Banns. These records are a valuable research tool for family historians because they date back centuries before civil registration. Banns were announcements made in the church on three separate Sundays during the three months leading up to the wedding day. The announcements were intended to give the congregation an opportunity to voice any objection to the marriage.

Warwickshire Marriages
Over 527,000 records have been added to our collection of Warwickshire Marriages.

Warwickshire Burials
Over 725,000 records have been added to our collection of Warwickshire Burials. Each record includes a transcript of the original burial registry or details from the monumental inscription and a number will include an image of the original document.

Browse Warwickshire Parish Registers
Browse through individual volumes in their entirety.

Irish Newspapers
Over 144,000 articles and one brand new title, the Portadown Times, have recently been added to our collection of historic British newspapers.

Also available:

Connecticut Baptisms, 1600s-1800s
Connecticut Church Records, 1600s-1800s
Connecticut Burials, 1600s-1800s

Records covering the towns of Coventry, East Hampton, Mansfield, New Haven, Norfolk, Norwich, Simsbury, Windsor, and Woodstock.


United States Marriages
Over 95,000 new records have just been added to our collection of United States Marriage records. Released in partnership with FamilySearch international, these latest additions mark the latest phase of efforts to create the single largest online collection of U.S. marriage records in history.

Further details and links at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-september-29th-2490694673.html

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Family Tree's genealogical Battlefields Tour

The UK's Family Tree magazine has organised a genealogically themed Battlefield Tour of Ypres, Belgium, from 13-15 October 2017, and is putting out a final call for anyone who might be interested in participating. Here's the itinerary:

Join us on the Family Tree Battlefield Tour. This is your chance to learn about your ancestor's time in WW1 and visit Plugstreet (Ploegsteert), Hill 60, Tyne Cot, Passchendaele, the Menin Gate and other important locations at the Front in the First World War, 13th to 15th October 2017

There’s something very special about visiting the places relevant to your ancestors’ lives, and none more so than the battlefields on which they lived, fought and died in the First World War.

Now, working in association with Battlefield Partnerships, Family Tree is running a battlefield tour this October led by Andy Robertshaw (Trench Detectives) and Mark Smith (Militaria Expert – The Antiques Roadshow), and we would like to invite you to come with us to Belgium.

With military experts, Q&A sessions & guided tours, we have put together this bespoke battlefield tour with the needs of family historians first and foremost in mind. It’s going to be a packed itinerary, and a small group, to make sure that everyone booked on the tour gets the most possible out of their valuable time at the battlefields.

Day 1, 13th October, Battlefield Orientation Day

Pick up Ebbsfleet International 8 am, then travel to Belgium by coach via Eurotunnel (the journey from Ebbsfleet to Ypres takes about 3 hrs 30 mins) Starting with Plugstreet and the battles of 1915, Messines and the Spanbroekmolen Crater, mine warfare and the very successful attack of 1917. We then move on to Hill 60, and after lunch, the cemetery of Tyne Cot and Passchendaele Village. Then on to the northern end of the Ypres Salient to see the village of St Julien and the first gas attack of April 1915, before an emotive stop at Langemarck, the German cemetery, before moving our evening meal.

After supper: A Q&A session on military genealogical matters and object identification.

Day 2, 14th October: Visits Day

Devoted to your research and visit to the cemeteries and battlefields of your ancestors.

Menin Gate Ceremony at 8pm.

Day 3, 15th October: Case Study

A study of one man and his involvement in the Great War – a research tour conducted by Andy Robertshaw and Mark Smith.

Drop off Ebbsfleet International 8pm.

Price, including travel, accommodation at Skindles in Poperinghe, evening meals (one at Skindles, one at a restaurant in Poperinge, and breakfast) per person £475 (£449 per subscriber to Family Tree). All travellers must provide evidence of travel insurance before travel.

On booking, please include details of your First World War ancestors, so that we can fine-tune our itinerary where possible to help you get the most from the tour.

This genealogical-based bespoke tour offers you the unique opportunity to travel to the battlefields with two well-known military historians who will help you to bring to life your military ancestors’ involvement in the Great War.

This is your opportunity to bring along your artefacts and stories and over the three days you will be given an understanding of the Ypres environs during WW1 and spend time with your fellow travellers visiting the actual areas your ancestor fought over.

For further details visit https://www.family-tree.co.uk

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Wednesday, 27 September 2017

Will there be further Scottish coverage on FreeCEN?

I'm currently teaching a course on online Scottish resources, and as part of discussion concerning the volunteer census transcription project FreeCEN (www.freecen.org.uk), a student (Dave) flagged up a note I had not read before concerning the status of future transcriptions for Scotland, which is available at http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~sctfc/:

Unfortunately, we currently have no more Scottish census images to transcribe. We still have opportunities for experienced volunteers to work as checkers, but we are not recruiting transcribers. If you would like to become a transcriber for another part of the UK, please contact FreeCEN Chairperson, Brenda Bowers, who will gladly get you started.

We would like to extend our gratitude and appreciation to all the people who have contributed to the Scotland Free Census Project.

I mentioned this on last night's AncestryHour on Twitter, and have had the following response from @FreeUKGen:

Not one to rest on our laurels, we're working on something that *might* let us break through that particular brick wall...

Fingers crossed, and more news if and when I get it...

(With thanks to @FreeUKGen)

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Thursday, 21 September 2017

Meeting a FreeCEN volunteer in Crete!

It's a small world really! Last night at a Greek taverna in Crete, a couple seated next to me at the bar, Brian and Diane Collins from North Wales, got talking with me. Within seconds we were talking genealogy, because it soon transpired that Brian is in fact a volunteer for the FreeCEN project (www.freecen.org.uk).

FreeCEN is a volunteer based project designed to provide free to access transcriptions of the censuses in Britain from 1841-1891. Volunteers at the Scottish end started with 1841, and are moving forward through the range, whilst English and Welsh volunteers started at 1891 and are moving backwards. It's a long standing work in progress, but has many key advantages over some of the commercial sites, in that underpinning the transcription effort is an equally impressive effort to oversee the quality of the transcriptions using local knowledge, thanks to people like Brian. Brian's role is to check what transcribers are producing, and to make any corrections needed where there has been an error in interpretation from the original source record.


FreeCEN is certainly a site worth bookmarking - I have actually found entries using the site that in the past ScotlandsPeople has not even indexed correctly. And don't forget to check out the future version of FreeCEN, currently available on a beta site at https://freecen2.freecen.org.uk.

(With thanks to Brian and Diane - have a great stay in Crete!)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.